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Full text of "The Instructor"

it E Instructor 

D E CEMBER 19 6 4 






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THE DOUBTFUL THOMAS 

Three Lions, photo; F. Donald Isbell, author § ;n: 

GREAT WORDS TO LIVE BY 
by Marie F. Felt 


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ADVANCEMENT SCHEDULE, JANUARY 3, 1965 
by Deseret Sunday School Union General Board 


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MAKING HISTORY COME ALIVE 
by Richard O. Cowan 

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CHRIST IS THE TRUE LIGHT 

OF MEN'S LIVES 



by President David 0. McKay 



There is joy in Christmas which is unsurpassed 
by any other season or event in the year. With this 
celebration is associated the soul satisfaction that 
comes from losing self for the happiness of others. 
Because of this, though Christmas had no other 
virtue, each Yuletide should find the world a little 
better than the last, and men and women a little 
more inclined to strive to establish peace on earth. 

Ever since man was placed on earth, peace has 
been among his noblest quests. Associated with it 
has been his desire for freedom — freedom to express 
what he thinks, freedom to choose his work without 
dictatorial compulsion, freedom to worship without 
molestation, freedom to own a home into which 
dictators or usurpers may not enter unbidden — in- 
dispensable conditions to the enjoyment of peace! 

It is my conviction that millions of sincere people 
the world over are praying and striving for this 
consummation. 

Church Members Loyal to Ideals and Teachings 

The loyalty of the members of the Church to the 
ideals and teachings of the Man of Galilee has been 
evidenced by the response of tens of thousands to 
the message of the Restored Gospel as proclaimed 
by messengers at home and abroad, by ready and 
willing response to "calls" and assignments, and by 
increased tithes and offerings. 



(For all Christmas lessons.) 



Art by Keith Eddington. 



All such efforts contribute to the joy and peace 
Christ came to establish. 

But let us ever remember that the price of peace 
is eternal vigilance and constant righteous efforts. 
Forces of evil and misery are still rampant in the 
world and must be resisted. The Powers of Dark- 
ness have increased in accordance with the spread 
of the Gospel. Whole nations are declaring atheism 
to be the law of the land. Atheism has become the 
greatest weapon Satan has to use, and its evil in- 
fluence is bringing degradation to millions through- 
out the world. Even at this moment as the sun 
throws warm, genial rays on snow-capped summits 
and frost- covered valleys of this western land, the 
public press tells of increasing activity on the part 
of the Evil One. Warlike activities and international 
misunderstandings prevent the establishing of Peace 
and divert man's inventive genius from the paths of 
science, art, and literature, and apply it to human 
retardation and the holocausts of war. 

Happiness and Peace Will Come 

The rising sun can dispel the darkness of night, 
but it cannot banish the blackness of malice, hatred, 
bigotry, and selfishness from the hearts of human- 
ity. Happiness and peace will come to earth only 
as the Light of Love and human compassion enter 
the souls of men. 

It was for this purpose that Christ, the Son of 



DECEMBER 1964 



461 



Righteousness, "with healing in his wings" came in 
the meridian of time. Through Him wickedness 
will be overcome; and hatred, enmity, strife, pov- 
erty, and war abolished. This will not be accom- 
plished, however, with atomic bombs and battleshot; 
with submarines or poison gas, but with a slow but 
never-failing process of changing men's mental and 
spiritual attitudes. The ways and habits of the 
world depend upon the thoughts and soul-convictions 
of men and women. If, therefore, we would change 
the world, we must first change people's thoughts. 
Only to the extent that men desire Peace and Broth- 
erhood can the world be made better. Only by 
adhering to sound principles can peace come, either 
to individuals or nations. 

Christ Is the Saviour 

Christ is the true light of men's lives. He is 
the Son of God — the Saviour of the world! His 
coming was heralded by heavenly hosts singing: 
"Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace, 
good will toward men." (Luke 2:14.) 

Thus was recorded the greatest and most mo- 
mentous fact in the history of the world. In His 
taking upon Himself mortality, Christ personified 
Deity; in His walks and teachings among men, He 
exemplified the true philosophy of being; in His 
death and resurrection, He opened the door to life 
and immortality. 

Rejecting the Tempter's scheme of coercion and 
self-glorification, the Saviour established a plan that 
will regenerate men's souls. He knew that this re- 
generating force would be silent, almost impercep- 
tible; slow in gaining momentum, and disappointing 
to all except only those who caught His vision; vic- 
torious only through His death, resurrection, and 
Second Coming. 

With the announcement of the Birth of the Sa- 
viour by the Heavenly Hosts more than nineteen 
centuries ago, there was given a message which, if 
heeded, would unite peoples of all nations in a 
friendliness that would bring not suspicion and fear 
of the possibility of any atomic war, but confidence 
and resultant peace. 

Many and swift are the changes that have come 
to the peoples of the world since the announcement 
of the angels, but the principles they gave remain 
changeless and ever applicable and essential to the 
happiness, salvation, and exaltation of the children 
of men. These principles as summarized are: 

1. Faith in God ("Glory to God in the High- 
est"). 



2. Peace through brotherly love ("Peace on 
earth"). 

3. Good will and fellowship ("Good will among 
men"). 

Christmas: Celebration of Jesus' Birth 

No worry or anxiety over the choosing and giv- 
ing of gifts; no enjoyment of holiday feasts; no dec- 
orations however modern or attractive; no social 
parties however jovial, should ever overshadow the 
fact that Christmas is the celebration of the birth 
of Jesus Christ who came to give Life, light, and 
Peace to all mankind, and who marked the Way by 
which these eternal blessings may be obtained. Let 
us ever remember that ". . . God so loved the world, 
that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever 
believeth in him should not perish, but have ever- 
lasting life." (John 3:16.) 

This love of our Father has been manifested ever 
since He gave free agency to man and was particu- 
larly made known during the earthly life of Jesus, 
by His teachings. To His disciples in that day, He 
said: "These things I have spoken unto you, that 
in me ye might have peace. In the world ye shall 
have tribulation: but be of good cheer; I have over- 
come the world." (John 16:33.) 

"This Is My Beloved Son" 

This love was again demonstrated eighteen hun- 
dred years later when the Father introduced the 
Saviour to the young man, Joseph Smith, saying: 
"This is My Beloved Son. Hear Him!" 

Under this divine authority, Jesus, the Babe 
of Bethlehem, who later established His Gospel 
among men, who was crucified, resurrected, and who 
lives today, again established His Church that all 
mankind might hear His word and receive eternal 
blessings through obedience to the laws and ordi- 
nances of the Gospel. 

Therefore, let your gifts to one another carry 
with them a reminder of the Father's gift of His 
only begotten Son, who in turn gave to all the gift 
of the Gospel. Let the pleasures of the season be 
subordinated to the true spiritual meaning of this 
greatest of all festivities — The Birth of Our Lord 
and Saviour Jesus Christ. 

"... For there is none other name under heaven 
given among men, whereby we must be saved." 
(Acts 4:12.) 



Library File Reference : Jesus Christ. 



462 



THE INSTRUCTOR 




Photo by H. Armstrong Roberts. 




by Carlton Culmsee 



Turning the yellow scroll of history, 
I saw that the most precious gifts to man 
Have come from poor men. Bosoms thinly clad 
Can feel the bitter wind of the world's need. 
And there are earnest souls who are ashamed 
That they can give the needy ones about them 
So little food and clothing; so they search 
Their hearts with the thin fingers of their longing 
And sometimes bring forth strangely finer things. 

My mother gave me much, but over all 
I hold the love of Christmas that she fostered, 
Christmas in deeper meaning. 

First she lit 
The little crimson candle of a baby's 
Primitive glee with jolly Yuletide lilts, 
Colors, and lights. Next with the tale of Christ 
She kindled the white taper of young awe. 

(For alt Christmas lessons.) 



And then one empty Christmas, with her sadness 
At having nothing for the ones she loved — 
A sorrow almost covered with a smile 
And words of hope — she made me see a gleam 
Of something that I should have seen before: 
That folks in threadbare garments hold the power 
Of doing splendid deeds and giving greatly, 
As Jesus proved long centuries ago. 

That gleam has brightened to reveal a world 
More rich and potent, with a sunrise flush 
Of promise. 

Likely I shall never gather 
A heap of heavy gold, but I believe 
That some day I may reach an inner vein 
Of some strong metal for the tools of men 
Who work the roadways to the high plateau. 

* Reprinted by permission from The Improvement Em, December, 
1934, page 707. 
Library File Reference: Christmas. 



DECEMBER 1964 



463 



Will YOU 
Be a Missionary 



by Howard C. May cock' 

"Have you ever known down deep in your heart 
that your prayers were answered? Have you felt 
the sensation of being 'pricked in your heart' as were 
the people who listened to the apostles on the day of 
Pentecost? Has the joyous experience ever been 
yours to know that spiritual things are just as real 
as are physical things?" 

It was a North German missionary who was 
asking these questions of the Saints in Kiel Branch, 
Schleswig-Holstein District, Germany. He was ex- 
plaining why every member should be a missionary, 
as our beloved prophet, David O. McKay, has 
asked us to be. 

The missionary continued, "The Lord has prom- 
ised us great joy if we bring souls unto Him; and 
I testify to you that the greatest joy I, personally, 
have ever known has come to me through helping 
to bring souls unto Christ. President McKay has 
called each of us into this service. Not all of you 
will be set apart as I have been. That opportunity 
may come later to some of you. You, young people, 
especially, should be planning for your own mis- 
sions. But right now, all of us can be missionaries. 

"Let me tell you how to begin. Simply start by 
asking the two 'Golden Questions' of your friends, 
neighbors, and associates who are not members of 
the Church. Just ask, 'How much do you know 
about the Mormons?' It doesn't matter what an- 
swer you get. You then ask the second question: 
'You would like to know more, wouldn't you?' 

"Do you see that by interpreting the answers to 
these two questions you are able to separate the 
teachable from those who are not? Some may not 
want to know more at the time you first ask these 
questions, but then later, because of something that 
has happened to them or because of someone's good 
works, they may change their minds. We, the 
missionaries, will then join with you and teach those 
who want to know more. 

"Will you help us to find these teachable people? 
Will you set up teaching opportunities for us? Will 
you be missionaries?" 

Among those who were willing to accept this 

(For Course 9, lesson of February 21, "A Leader Cooperates 
with God"; for Course 11, lesson of February 28, "How Our Church 
Spreads"; for Course 7, lesson of February 21, "Missionaries Teach 
the Gospel"; and of general interest.) 




Art by Dale Kilbourn. 

first invitation was Sister Rieber. She is one of 
those wonderfully sweet persons to whom one is 
drawn, as by a magnet. Her interest in other peo- 
ple has always caused all who knew her to love her. 
Service to fellowmen has long been her way of life. 
To be in her presence is to experience a warm, inner 
feeling that life is purposeful and that being able to 
live is a great privilege. Perhaps the many experi- 
ences she has had during her long, eventful life have 
helped her to develop that sweet personality; for 
her life's path has not been all sunshine. Her hus- 
band died many years ago, leaving her a widow 
without children. Not to have been a mother was 
a great disappointment to her. In addition, she had 
known the' calamities and misfortunes which two 
world wars had brought to her native land. 

With all of this, Sister Rieber could have led a 
lonely life. But, no, she was not one to complain 
and wonder why all these things had happened to 
her. She accepted her lot and then proceeded to 

"Howard C Maycock was recently released as president of the 
North German Mission. Earlier in his life he served as a missionary 
in what was then the Swiss-German Mission. He is now employed 
as vice president of the Springville (Utah) Banking Company. He 
and his wife, the former Mary Verl Simmons, are parents of three 
children. 



464 



THE INSTRUCTOR 



improve on it. Now the Gospel had come into her 
life and with it the joy of living as a Latter-day Saint. 

Sister Rieber saw in this invitation of the elder 
an opportunity to help by sharing with her many 
friends the great happiness she had come to know 
in the Church. Enthusiastically she accepted this 
new challenge. With gentle love and mild persua- 
sion she induced one friend after another to want 
to know more about Mormonism. 

It is true, they have not all joined the Church. 
But all have learned more about it. And today, 
more than ten families are members because this 
good sister was willing to do her part in this great 
cause. How grateful and proud she is that so many 
have made a covenant with the Lord in the waters 
of baptism! Truly she has found the joy which the 
Lord has promised those who labor in His vineyard. 

Now, another true story. On the banks of the 
Elbe River, about fifty miles from where it empties 
into the North Sea, is the beautiful city of Ham- 
burg. In this city, winding along the north bank 
of the river, is a street called Elbchaussee. And 
on this street lives a young girl whose name is 
Angelika Fricke. 

Angelika is now 15 years old. Her father is 
caretaker of the Altona Ward chapel; he is also 
ward clerk. Her mother works in the auxiliary 
organizations, Angelika has a younger sister named 
Beata. 

When Angelika's mother received her patriarchal 
blessing, she was promised that her daughters would 
fill missions. But Angelika did not want to wait 
until she was formally called on a full-time mission. 
When the Church program, "Every Member a Mis- 
sionary," was introduced in her ward, even though 



she was only 12 years old at the time, she wanted 
to be a part of it. So she visited people who lived 
on Elbchaussee and invited them to meet the mis- 
sionaries and to come to church — to the Lord's 
Church. 

She did not stop with the invitations. She would 
actually go and get them. Though she was young, 
she was thrilled to be able to bear her testimony 
to these people. Some were young people, her own 
age. Others were older, and some were even elderly. 
Their ages made no difference to Angelika. She felt 
that all should know about the Church and have a 
chance to be taught the Gospel by the elders. 

Maybe it was the sincerity of a young girl that 
caused these people to accept Angelika's invitation. 
But come they did. Once she suffered an accident 
and had to spend a week in the hospital. Here also 
she took advantage of the opportunity to tell others 
about the Church. 

Recently a Youth Missionary Day was observed, 
and Angelika was invited to go with two mission- 
aries to visit five families. All of these families 
expressed a desire to learn more and are now be- 
ing taught the principles of the Restored Gospel. 

These are just two examples of how members 
throughout the world are serving the Lord in preach- 
ing the Gospel to every nation, kindred, tongue, 
and people. Without the assistance of all Church 
members, the missionaries could not possibly meet 
with the success they are now having. Truly, "the 
Gospel of the Kingdom shall be preached in all the 
world as a witness." Each day brings its oppor- 
tunities for this rewarding service. 

Will you do your part? 



Library File Reference: Missionaries — Mormon. 



INSTRUCTOR STAFF 



Editor : 
President David O. McKay 

Associate Editobs: 

General Superintendent George R. Hill 

Lorin F. Wheelwright 

Business Manager: 
Richard E. Folland 

Managing Editor: 
Boyd O. Hatch 

Production Editor: 
Burl Shephard 

Manuscript Editor: 
Richard E. Scholle 

Research Editor: 
H. George Bickerstaff 

Art Director: 
Sherman T. Martin 

Circulation Manager: 
Joan Barber 

Instructor Secretary: 
Pat Gehrke 

Consultant : 
A. William Lund 



Instructor Committee: 

Chairman Lorin F. Wheelwright, Richard E. 
Folland, Marie F. Felt, A. William Lund, Ken- 
neth S. Bennion, H. Aldous Dixon, Leland H. 
Monson, Alexander Schreiner, Lorna C. Alder, 
Vernon J. LeeMaster, Claribel W. Aldous, 
Melba Glade, Henry Eyring, Clarence Tyndall, 
Wallace G. Bennett, Camille W. Halliday, 
Margaret Hopkinson, Mima Rasband, Edith 
M. Nash, Alva H. Parry, Bernard S. Walker, 
Paul B. Tanner, Lewis J. Wallace, Arthur D. 
Browne, Howard S. Bennion, Herald L. Carl- 
ston, Bertrand F. Harrison, Willis S. Peterson, 
Greldon L. Nelson, Jane Hopkinson, G. Robert 
Ruff, Anthony I. Bentley, Marshall T. Burton, 
Calvin C. Cook, A. Hamer Reiser, Robert M. 
Cundick, Clarence L. Madsen, J. Elliot Cam- 
eron, Bertrand A. Childs. 



Published by the Deseret Sunday School Union 
of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day 
Saints, the first day of every month at Salt Lake 
City, Utah. Entered at Salt Lake City Post Office 
as second class matter acceptable for mailing at 
special rate of postage provided in Section 1103, 
Act of Oct. 3, 1917, authorized on July 8, 1928. 
Copyright 1964 by the Deseret Sunday School 
Union Board. All rights reserved. 

Thirty to forty-five days' notice required for 
change of address. When ordering a change, 
please include address slip from a recent issue 
of the magazine. Address changes cannot be 
made unless the old address as well as the new 
one is included. Also, report the new postal ZIP 
Code number. 

Mail subscriptions to The Instructor, 135 South 
State Street, Salt Lake City, Utah, 84111. Subscrip- 
tion price is $3 per year paid in advance. Single 
issues, 35 cents each. 

Bound volumes sell for $6.75 when all maga- 
zines are furnished by The Instructor. When sub- 
scriber supplies his own issues, binding charge 
is $3.75. 



DECEMBER 1964 



465 



«e 



A Chosen Vessel Unto Me 



99 



In restoring the Gospel to the earth in these 
latter days, the Lord again gave unto the members 
of His Church evangelical ministers or patriarchs. 

It is the duty of the Twelve, in all large branches 
of the church, to ordain evangelical ministers, as they 
shall be designated unto them by revelation. (Doc- 
trine and Covenants 107:39.) 

In this revelation, the Lord further indicated that 
"This order was instituted in the days of Adam. ..." 
(Doctrine and Covenants 107:41.) 

The importance of this calling is evident from 
the fact that the Lord by revelation took Hyrum 
Smith, the brother of the Prophet Joseph Smith, 
out of the First Presidency of the Church and called 
him to be the patriarch to the Church. (See Doctrine 
and Covenants 124:91-93.) 

To understand and appreciate the calling of a 
patriarch, one must understand the principle of the 
preexistence of spirits. From the book of Abraham 
in The Pearl of Great Price, we obtain a clear under- 
standing of this principle. 

Now the Lord had shown unto me, Abraham, the 
intelligences that were organized before the world 
was; and among all these there were many of the 
noble and great ones; 

And God saw these souls that they were good, 
and he stood in the midst of them, and he said: 
These I will make my rulers; for he stood among 
those that were spirits, and he saw that they were 
good; and he said unto me: Abraham, thou art one 
of them; thou wast chosen before thou wast born. 
(Abraham 3:22, 23.) 

While the Lord stood in the midst of these spirits 
indicating that there were many noble and great 
ones whom he would make his rulers, none of these 
spirits brought with them into this world a knowl- 
edge that they were among the noble and great 
spirits, and that they would be called by the Lord 
to be leaders among His people. This knowledge 
had to come to them later. The scriptures give us 
many illustrations of this fact. 

While Jesus Christ was the creator of this earth 
and all things pertaining thereunto (see John 1:1-3, 
14), nevertheless, He was born as other children and 
had to learn to walk and talk; but the Father re- 
vealed unto Jesus, as He increased in years, who He 
really was and what His mission in life was to be. 

(For Course 17, lesson of March 21, "The Purpose of Life"; for 
Course 27, lessons of February 7 and 14, "Cain and Abel"; and of 
general interest.) 



by Elder LeGrand Richards 
of the Council of the Twelve 

At the age of 12, Jesus was reasoning with the 
wise men in the temple, and of this time in His life 
we read: "And Jesus increased in wisdom and stat- 
ure, and in favour with God and man." (Luke 2:52.) 

Had He brought with Him all the knowledge He 
had when He was with the Father and was the 
Creator of this earth, He would not have had to 
increase in wisdom and stature and in favor with 
God and man. Later we hear Jesus say: 

/ came forth from the Father, and am come into 
the world: again, I leave the world, and go to the 
Father. (John 16:28.) 

J have glorified thee on the earth: I have fin- 
ished the work which thou gavest me to do. And 
now, Oh Father, glorify thou me with thine own 
self with the glory which I had with thee before 
the world was. (John 17:4, 5.) 

Just as Jesus was sent at the particular time 
appointed by the Lord to do the work for which He 
had been foreordained, so were many of the "noble 
and great spirits" among whom the Lord stood when 
He said, "These I will make my rulers," such as 
Jeremiah: 

Then the word of the Lord came unto me, say- 
ing, Before I formed thee in the belly I knew thee; 
and before thou earnest forth out of the womb I 
sanctified thee, and I ordained thee a prophet unto 
the nations. (Jeremiah 1:4, 5.) 

But Jeremiah did not bring this knowledge with 
him into mortality and therefore had to be told. 

This was also true of the Apostle Paul. While 
he went about persecuting the Saints, he was sincere 
in his belief that he was doing God's service. So the 
Saviour appeared to him on the road to Damascus to 
let him know how wrong he was. And when the 
Saviour told Ananias to go to Paul, Ananias could 
not understand because he knew of Paul's activity 
in persecuting the Saints; so the Saviour said to him: 

. . . Go thy way: for he is a chosen vessel unto 
me, to bear my name before the Gentiles, and kings, 
and the children of Israel. (Acts 9:15.) 

Just as Paul was a "chosen vessel," so many have 
been appointed by the Lord to do the work for which 
they were called before they were born.. 

Such was the case with the Prophet Joseph 
Smith. As Lehi told his son, Joseph, in the wilder- 



466 



THE INSTRUCTOR 




Elder LeGrand Richards 

ness, the Lord promised that in the latter days He 
would raise up a prophet from the loins of Joseph 
who was sold into Egypt, one like unto Moses, who 
would bring forth His word and bring men to con- 
viction of His word which had already gone forth 
among them; and this prophet would bring men unto 
salvation and would be great in His eyes. (See 2 
Nephi 3:1-15.) 

This prophet was Joseph Smith, and the Lord 
had him in waiting for his day and time, just as He 
has ordained many other "noble and great" spirits. 

The Apostle Paul understood this when he said: 

And hath made of one blood all nations of men 
for to dwell on all the face of the earth, and hath 
determined the times before appointed, and the 
bounds of their habitation. (Acts 17:26.) 

The patriarch, through the spirit of revelation to 
which he is entitled through his ordination, should 
be able to reveal in his blessing some of the special 
qualifications and purposes for which the individual 
member has come into the world at his particular 
time. No doubt many of us in our blessings have 
been told that we have not come upon the earth by 
chance, but in fulfillment of the decrees of the Al- 
mighty, to perform the mission for which we were 
foreordained. 

As I read my blessing given to me by my father, 
then a stake patriarch, when I was only 8 years old, 
it is a miracle to me that he should have been able 
to so fully indicate my mission and calling in life. 
It seems to me like writing history in advance. 

The patriarch is also expected to define the lin- 
eage through which we are born. 



"And he gave some, apostles; and some, prophets; 
and some, evangelists; and some, pastors and teachers; for 
the perfecting of the saints. . . ." (Ephesians 4:11, 12.) 



In addition to this, he can remind those who 
receive blessings at his hands of the wonderful prom- 
ises of the Lord to His Saints of this dispensation 
through the keeping of His commandments. 

For thus saith the Lord — /, the Lord, am merci- 
ful and gracious unto those who fear me, and delight 
to honor those who serve me in righteousness and in 
truth unto the end. 

Great shall be their reward and eternal shall be 
their glory. 

And to them will I reveal all mysteries, yea, all 
the hidden mysteries of my kingdom from days of 
old, and for ages to come, will I make known unto 
them the good pleasure of my will concerning all 
things pertaining to my kingdom. 

Yea, even the wonders of eternity shall they 
know, and things to come will I show them, even the 
things of many generations. 

And their wisdom shall be great, and their under- 
standing reach to heaven; and before them the wis- 
dom of the wise shall perish, and the understanding 
of the prudent shall come to naught. 

For by my Spirit will I enlighten them, and by 
my power will I make known unto them the secrets 
of my will — yea, even those things which eye has 
not seen, nor ear heard, nor yet entered into the 
heart of man. (Doctrine and Covenants 76:5-10.) 

He may also warn them of the consequences of 
not keeping the commandments of the Lord. Presi- 
dent Brigham Young once said: 

. . . If we neglect our prayers and our sacrament 
meetings, we neglect the Spirit of the Lord, and a 
spirit of darkness comes over us. 1 

The Lord said in a revelation through the Proph- 
et Joseph Smith: 

/, the Lord, am bound when ye do what I say; 
but when ye do not what I say, ye have no promise. 
(Doctrine and Covenants 82:10.) 

The stake patriarch is authorized to give bless- 
ings to members of his stake, after they have ob- 
tained a recommend signed by the bishop. He may 
also give blessings to members of other stakes, upon 
presentation of a recommend signed by the bishop 
and stake president. He may also give blessings 
to members of missions upon receipt of a recom- 
mend signed by the branch and mission presidents. 
He may also give blessings to his own blood relations. 

The patriarch to the Church may give blessings 
to any Church member, when such member is prop- 
erly recommended. 



^Discourses of Brigham Young, selected and arranged by John A. 
Widtsoe; Deseret Book Company, Salt Lake City, Utah, 1951; page 

Library File Reference: Patriarchal Blessings. 



DECEMBER 1964 



467 



TEAMWORK 
FOR SUCCESS 

by Bruce W. Wilkin* 

Whenever possible, a family association should 
direct all major genealogical research projects within 
the family. This is necessary to prevent duplication 
of effort and to make profitable use of time and 
money spent by family members. 

The association must not discourage individuals 
from doing research, but instead should coordinate 
and direct these efforts to give everyone an oppor- 
tunity to engage actively in research, while all work 
toward a common goal. Before plans for directing 
research can be made, however, the person in charge 
of the genealogical research for a family association 
must learn exactly what work has been done in trac- 
ing ancestral lines and compiling records of the 

(For Course 21, lesson of February 7, "A Family Association"; 
and of general interest.) 

* Bruce W. Wilkin is a pharmacy student at the University of 
Utah. He has also attended classes at Brigham Young University. 
His wife is the former Carla Jo Thompson. 



Whenever possible, a family association should direct major 
genealogical projects within a family; but it should not dis- 
courage individual research while coordinating all efforts. 



family. This was my task following the formation 
of the Robert Easton — Elizabeth Laird Family Asso- 
ciation in February, 1964. 

From some of the older members of the family 1 
obtained the records of research and temple work 
which had been done from ten to thirty years ago. 
In these records I found names of eight of the grand- 
parents and great-grandparents of Elizabeth Laird. 
A search of the records of work done in the St. 
George Temple in November, 1878, provided names 
and birthplaces of the father and grandfather of 
Robert Easton as well as names, birthplaces, and re- 
lationships of 24 other close relatives. 

These two sources provided names of ten an- 
cestors whom no living members of the family had 
known of before. Also found in these records were 
names of ten parishes in the shires of Stirling, Lan- 
ark, West Lothian, and Midlothian, Scotland, in 
which ancestors or close relatives had definitely lived 
during the period of 1710 to 1850. Yet records of 
earlier research showed that only two of these ten 
parishes had been searched extensively. 

An examination of 
the parish registers of 
m i d- Scotland con- 
vinced me that there 
is an excellent possi- 
bility of extending sev- 
eral or all of the an- 
cestral lines on the 




468 



THE INSTRUCTOR 



existing pedigrees. Also the completeness of 
these parish registers i n d i ca t e d that a thor- 
ough search should produce family group sheets 
which are much more complete and accurate than 
those which had been compiled previously. To re- 
duce the omissions from family groups, which result 
from parents having children christened in more 
than one parish, and also to comply with the rela- 
tionship and research standards of the Genealogical 
Society as outlined in Sections 8 and 9 of the Gen- 
ealogical Instruction Manual, I realized that searches 
for ancestors and relatives must be carried out not 
only in the parishes in which they had actually lived, 
but also in all of the surrounding parishes lying 
within a ten-mile radius. On a large-scale map of 
mid-Scotland I inscribed circles of a ten-mile ra- 
dius around each town or parish in which my an- 
cestors or relatives had lived. These circles covered 
all or part of more than 70 parishes in which 
searches must be carried out. 

To facilitate the searching of such a large num- 
ber of parish registers, I decided to use the genealogy 
card-file index system of Brother J. Grant Steven- 
son, which I learned about in his classes at Brigham 
Young University. With this system a person simply 
reads through a parish register and records on 3" x 5" 
index cards all the entries which pertain to persons 
of the same surname as those of his ancestors who 
lived in the same locality. The pedigrees of Robert 
Easton and Elizabeth Laird included the surnames 
EASTON, LAIRD, ADIE, BROWN, COWAN, 
RUSSELL, and WALKER. Thus I would extract 
all of the entries in the registers in which any of 
these surnames appeared as the name of either par- 
ent, the name of one of the parties in a marriage 
entry, or the name of a deceased person. After all 
the desired entries from one parish have been re- 
corded on the index cards, I then separate them 
into christening, marriage, and death groups and 
filed in alphabetical order according to the surname 
and given name. The cards for each parish are kept 
separate and filed in this manner. 

In compiling family group sheets from these card 
files, we can start by recording the marriage data 
for each couple on a separate sheet and then go 
through the index files of christenings and record 
the information for each child on the appropriate 
sheet with his parents. To find birth dates and 



places of the husband and wife on each sheet and 
also the names of their parents, their birth dates can 
be approximated from their marriage date and then 
the proper files can be searched for persons of these 
same names who were born during these time 
periods. 

Marriage information for each child on the family 
group sheets should be found by determining from 
their birthdates the probable time period of their 
marriage and then making the searches in the mar- 
riage records of this period. Information from the 
death records should also be included on the sheets 
when available. To complete the information on 
each sheet, let us remember to search the files from 
all registers in the locality in which we are working. 
Once the sheets have been completed, we should be' 
able to determine the exact relationships from gen- 
eration to generation and their relationship to our 
family representative in many cases. 

Because I alone could not possibly search nearly 
150 rolls of microfilm within any reasonable length 
of time, I felt that the best course to follow would 
be to enlist the help of interested family members 
who live within driving distance of the Genealogical 
Society Library. I wrote a set of simple instruc- 
tions for searching the registers and recording the 
information on the cards and have given a copy of 
these instructions and the cards for recording the 
entries to each person who wants to work on this 
project. I assign a particular parish or roll of micro- 
film for each person to search, and after this has 
been completed I collect these cards and use 
them to compile the family group sheets. The sim- 
plicity of this system makes it possible for even those 
persons with little or no previous research experience 
to engage in useful and important research if they 
can read and write and follow directions. 

This project is now underway; the initial find- 
ings indicate an excellent possibility of extending 
the pedigrees of our Scottish ancestors as well as 
the definite probability of finding the names of sev- 
eral hundred or even several thousand relatives. Our 
success will be measured not only in terms of quan- 
tity; of equal importance will be the higher quality 
and greater accuracy of the records which result 
from this type of teamwork in the family association. 



Library File Reference: Genealogy. 



DECEMBER 1964 



469 



THE FRUITS OF 
THE GOSPEL* 



by Elder Richard L. Evans 
of The Council of The Twelve 

Our theme tonight is "The Fruits of the Gospel"; 
and I thought as I was contemplating coming here 
of a song that suggests some of the fruits, a song 
which touches my heart deeply and stirs my mem- 
ories most fondly: 

Thanks for the Sabbath School 

Hail to the day 

When evil and error are fleeing away. 

Thanks for our teachers who labor with care 

That we in the light of the Gospel may share. 

Now in the morning of life let us try 
Each virtue to cherish, all vice to decry; 
Strive with the noble in deeds that exalt 
And battle with energy each childish fault. 

May we endeavor through life's devious way 
To watch and be earnest; true wisdom display; 
Try to o'er-come each temptation and snare, 
Thereby full salvation eternally share. 1 

The last phrase in this stirring hymn, "full 
salvation eternally share," is the ultimate fruit of 
the Gospel. 

There are some other lesser fruits along the way, 
or other fruits that make up the total. The fruits 
of the Gospel are love and harmony among neigh- 
bors and associates. The fruits of the Gospel are 
a useful life of joy through achievement and service 
to others. 

Those of us who are fortunate have had come 
into our lives people who cared enough to convince 
us that they really cared; and whose influence, be- 
cause of their love and sincerity and their lives, could 
not help being good. 

Now there are many by-products along the way 
which have their point and purpose, but these are 
not really the final fruits. Some things we count 
are not really fruits at all. Among the things we 
count quite frequently, and necessarily so, are statis- 
tics. Statistics are evidences, indicators, but they 
are not fruits; they are tools. 

Statistics Not Ignored 

At a stake conference not long ago, we made some 
mention of those who were attending seminary, and 

iWords by William Willes. 

♦Excerpts from a talk delivered by Elder Evans at the Deseret 
Sunday School Union Conference, Oct. 6, 1963, in the Salt Lake 
Tabernacle. 




: N 



m, 




Elder Richard L. Evans 

quite proudly someone reported that there were 
more than 50% of the students attending. I thought 
of the more than 40% who were not attending. 
At that conference we had 20% present of the total 
stake population. I thought of the four out of five 
who were not there, although it was an impressive 
congregation. 

We cannot ignore statistics. They are important 
as indicators of exposure. Recruiting committees 
who get out and gather in the flock are exceedingly 
important, because those who are not gathered do 
not get the message. Those who are not gathered 
are not even exposed; and we need to know who is 
and who is not being exposed to the Gospel. But 
these figures are not fruits. 

Now as to some other things that are not really 
"fruits." Subjects taught are not really "fruits." 
Buildings are not really "fruits," nor classrooms. 
They are all essential, and they are wonderful to 
achieve and to acquire; but they are not "fruits." 
Even activities are not really "fruits." 

These Are the Fruits 

Then what, really, are the "fruits"? Of course, 
what happens in people's lives, the results, the end 
product, the real character, and the everlasting qual- 
ities that become eternally part of a person and 
which make and modify his life here and now, these 
are the "fruits." Virtue, friendliness, honor and hon- 
esty, faith and faithfulness, service and devotion are 
"the fruits of the Gospel." To be even a little 
more specific, temple marriage and missions are fruits 
in the endlessly long list — but not attendance, not 
lessons, not subjects, not statistics. The fruits are 
the final product in the making of the man and in 
what he is inside himself and what he does. 



470 



THE INSTRUCTOR 



Cultivating These Fruits 

Now, how to cultivate these fruits. 

Some recent years ago I acquired at the Univer- 
sity of Nevada a study reprinted from back in 1883 
with a long title, "How to Organize, Classify, and 
Teach a Country School— and How To Study." A 
thoughtful dean down there had it reprinted and 
made me a present of a copy of it. And its counsel is 
as good as or better than when it was first printed 
in 1883: 

"The personal influence of the teacher, in mould- 
ing the character of his pupils, is the most important 
element in their education. Habits of thought and 
of life are more than knowledge, and the habits 
formed during school life may be more hurtful than 
helpful. Every strong teacher teaches more self than 
textbooks. . . . 

"A remark by an American writer, when asked 
by a friend what his daughter should study, has 
almost become proverbial among educators. 'It 
does not matter so much what your daughter studies, 
as under whom she studies.' And leading educa- 
tors are looking more to securing good teachers than 
good textbooks, feeling assured that good teachers 
will do good with any or no textbooks. . . . 

"In morals, a teacher cannot teach what he is 
not. If he talks what he is not it were better not 
said, for his life talks more forcibly and is sooner be- 
lieved both by children and adults. I have no 
patience with people who speak of their private lives 
as a thing apart from their vocations and especially 
in the case of teachers. . . . 

"The elements that make up a successful teacher 
are as numerous as the elements of human char- 
acter; but aside from scholarship, the principal 
ones are truth to self, devotion to duty, and love of 
pupils." 2 

I am thinking back to my own youth, as you 
think back to yours. I am thinking of a bishop, 
Thomas A. Clawson. I never knew my father. Here 
was a bishop who had his arm around me literally or 
figuratively a good part of my young life. I never 
doubted that he loved me; he convinced me that 
he cared. I am thinking of a man like John D. Giles, 
who taught me when I was a deacon and when I 
was a scout. It was not only in the classroom, but 
it was out in the mountains and in many activities 
under the stars and in prayer and in sports — a man 
who convinced me that he cared. When you con- 
vince a young person that you really care, your 
influence is greater than any textbook or any lesson 
on any subject. 

Thomas Carlyle said: "Conviction is worthless 
unless it is converted into conduct." 



And from the book of Jacob: "Ye have . . . lost 
the confidence of your children, because of your 
bad examples before them. . . ." (Jacob 2:35.) 

From Mosiah: ". . . Trust no one to be your 
teacher . . . except he be a man of God, walking in 
his ways and keeping his commandments." (Mosiah 
23:14.) 

"Whatever you would have your children be- 
come, strive to exhibit it in your lives and con- 
versations." 

Horace Mann said: "The teacher who is attempt- 
ing to teach without inspiring the pupil with a 
desire to learn is hammering on cold iron." 

This is the Gospel of the celestial kingdom; and 
the real fruit of the Gospel is to qualify ourselves 
for living with our loved ones in the presence of our 
Father and His Son, our Saviour. In the words of 
Albert Camus, an eminent writer not long since de- 
ceased, "We have nothing to lose except everything." 
How tragic it would be to be second best everlast- 
ingly! That would be missing the fruits of the 
Gospel in a larger measure than one would want to 
contemplate. 

Peter's Fruitful Contribution 

Whereby are given unto us exceeding great and 
precious promises: that by these ye might be par- 
takers of the divine nature, having escaped the cor- 
ruption that is in the world through lust. And 
beside this, giving all diligence, add to your faith 
virtue; and to virtue knowledge; and to knowledge 
temperance; and to temperance patience; and to 
patience godliness; and to godliness brotherly kind- 
ness; and to brotherly kindness charity. For if these 
things be in you, and abound, they make you that 
ye shall neither be barren nor unfruitful in the knowl- 
edge of our Lord Jesus Christ. But he that lacketh 
these things is blind, and cannot see afar off, and 
hath forgotten that he was purged from his old sins. 
Wherefore the rather, brethren, give diligence to 
make your calling and election sure: for if ye do 
these things, ye shall never fall: For so an entrance 
shall be ministered unto you abundantly into the 
everlasting kingdom of our Lord and Saviour Jesus 
Christ. (II Peter 1:4-11.) 

This ultimately is the great objective, and all else 
beside it is incidental. May I plead with you to 
think of those absent from your classes as well as 
those present. Perhaps more, to have the patience, 
the love, the charity, and all the other virtues 
which Peter enumerates, and many more; to reach 
out with great, wide, encompassing arms and hearts 
and bring in the absent, as well as to teach well 
those present; to convince all that you care; and to 
let your lives bear fruit in their lives. 

May I quote from our beloved President McKay, 
"Go home and live your religion; radiate what you 
are, and all who come under its influence will bene- 
fit from it." 



2 W. M. Welch, How To Organize, Classify, and Teach A Country 
School and How To Study, 



Library File Reference: Teachers and teaching. 



DECEMBER 1964 



471 




Why the Book 

of Mormon? 



(Its purpose and need in our world of 
science and technology.) 

BY FRANCIS W. KIRKHAM* 

A visit of seven days at the New York World's 
Fair included considerable time at the Mormon 
Pavilion. I was deeply impressed with its message 
of the restoration of the Gospel of Jesus Christ by 
means of the art, the printed and spoken word, and 
the movie, "Man's Search for Happiness." 

The Fair tells of the marvelous advances made 
in science and technology for man's happiness in 
mortal life. The Book of Mormon is a revelation 
from God, through holy prophets and by Jesus 
Christ, after His resurrection, to the people on the 
American continent. It not only proclaims the way 
to peace and happiness in mortal life by searching 
for truth and by obedience to the laws of life; it 
also declares greater joys in mortal life, and eternal 
progression by obedience to the truths of eternity. 

(For Course 11, lesson of February 7, "Purpose and Mission of 
the Book of Mormon"; for Course 15, lesson of January 24, "Struc- 
ture and Purpose of the Book of Mormon"; for Course 29, lessons of 
January 31 and February 7, "A Marvelous Work and a Wonder" and 
"Coming of the Book of Mormon"; and of general interest. 

* Francis W. Kirkham received his A.B. degree at the University 
of Michigan, his LL.B. at the University of Utah, and his Ph.D. at 
the University of California. He has served as Utah State Director 
of Vocational Education, superintendent of Granite School District 
(Utah), director of the National Child Welfare Association in New 
York City, director of the National Youth Administration, and in 
other positions of responsibility in the field of education. He has 
authored a number of books. One publication for which he is widely- 
known is A New Witness for Christ in America, a two-volume work 
about the Book of Mormon. He has spent a lifetime in research and 
study of the Book of Mormon. 



As early as April, 1829, near the beginning of 
the translation of the ancient records which are con- 
tained in the Book of Mormon, a revelation from God 
our Eternal Father was given to Joseph Smith. The 
first verse states: "A great and marvelous work is 
about to come forth unto the children of men." 
(Doctrine and Covenants 6:1.) This revelation, di- 
rected to Oliver Cowdery, who had volunteered to 
write the Book of Mormon as it was translated by 
Joseph Smith from the ancient records by the gift 
and power of God, contained wonderful directions 
to this devoted volunteer helper. The revelation 
states: 

Yea, whosoever will thrust in his sickle and reap, 
the same is called of God. Therefore, if you will ask 
of me you shall receive; if you will knock it shall be 
opened unto yoii. Now, as you have asked, behold, 
I say unto you, keep my commandments, and seek 
to bring forth and establish the cause of Zion; Seek 
not for riches but for wisdom, and behold, the mys- 
teries of God shall be unfolded unto you, and then 
shall you be made rich. Behold, he that hath eternal 
life is rich. (Doctrine and Covenants 6:4-7.) 

The summary of the physical, historical facts of 
the "coming forth" of the Book of Mormon by divine 
power, which have been written for over 125 years 
in hundreds of volumes, will not be accepted as pos- 
sible or true by persons who deny that supernatural 
events are possible. These skeptics assert that 
throughout the ages of man's existence such claims 
have been made to satisfy his inability to explain the 
powers of the universe and his own origin, and the 
purpose of his life on earth. 

More and more today, as shown in the world of 
science and technology displayed at the New York 
World's Fair, our great scientists are realizing and 
declaring that there must be a creator in the uni- 
verse. There must be a cause and a plan. 

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints 
positively and definitely declares to an eager, search- 
ing world that God, our Eternal Father, has revealed 
for all men the truth regarding our premortal exis- 
tence, the present purpose of our life, and our eternal 
life hereafter. The revealed and restored Gospel of 
Jesus Christ is the answer to "Man's Search for Hap- 
piness," as pictured in part and explained by the 
narrator, Elder Richard L. Evans, in the movie at 
the World's Fair. 

What then is the purpose of the Book of Mor- 
mon? It can have no value if it is only the reasoning 
of mortals. 

When this book appeared, many people said that 
Joseph Smith produced it. Since he claimed it was 
divine, he was declared a fraud, a fanatic; and it was 
thought that, like other such persons, he and his 
book would soon fade into oblivion. Consider for a 



472 



THE INSTRUCTOR 



moment the place and influence of the Book of Mor- 
mon in the literature of the world today. It is 
probably the widest published book today, next to 
the Bible. In 1963, over 100,000 persons accepted 
this record as divine and became baptized members 
of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 
Before discussing the purpose and need of the 
Book of Mormon in this age of science and tech- 
nology, let us consider this declaration of the Proph- 
et Joseph Smith: 

The Book of Mormon Published — 
The Church Organized. 
I wish to mention here that the title-page of the 
Book of Mormon is a literal translation, taken from 
the very last leaf, on the left hand side of the collec- 
tion or book of plates, which contained the record 
which has been translated, the language of the whole 
running the same as all Hebrew writing in general; 
(that is, from right to left) and that said title page 
is not by any means a modern composition, either 
of mine or of any other man who has lived or does 
live in this generation. 1 

Never before in the history of printed literature 
has such a statement been made. Joseph Smith did 
not know the purpose of the Book of Mormon until 
after he had dictated its contents. 

The title page in the Book of Mormon reads: 

"The Book of Mormon, An Account Written by 
the Hand of Mormon Upon Plates Taken From the 
Plates of Nephi." It also states that the records were 
". . . Written by way of commandment, and also by 
the spirit of prophecy and of revelation — Written 
and sealed up, and hid up unto the Lord, that they 
might not be destroyed — To come forth by the gift 
and power of God unto the interpretation thereof — 
Sealed by the hand of Moroni, and hid up unto the 
Lord, to come forth in due time by way of the Gen- 
tile — The interpretation thereof by the gift of God. 
. . . And also to the convincing of the Jew and Gen- 
tile that Jesus is the Christ, the Eternal God, 
manifesting himself unto all nations — And now, if 
there are faults they are the mistakes of men; where- 
fore, condemn not the things of God, that ye may 
be found spotless at the judgment-seat of Christ." 

Reduced to one sentence this says that the Book 
of Mormon was written by revelation from God, pre- 
served by divine power, to come forth and be trans- 
lated by divine power, to convince all men of all 
nations that Jesus is the Christ, the Eternal God, 
who will manifest Himself to all nations. 

In all the literature of all the world no person 
has ever made a similar claim for a book. As Orson 
Pratt, an early convert, declared: 

"This book must be either true or false. If true, 
it is one of the most important messages ever sent 



'Joseph Smith, Jun., History of the Church of Jesus Christ of 
Latter-day Saints, Vol. I; Deseret News, Salt Lake City, Utah, 1902; 
page 71. 



from God to man ... If false, it is one of the most 
cunning, wicked, bold, deep-laid impositions ever 
palmed upon the world, calculated to deceive and 
ruin millions who will sincerely receive it as the word 
of God. . . ." 2 

Through the century this challenge, accepted by 
the unbeliever, has resulted in more than a thou- 
sand books, pamphlets, and magazine articles de- 
claring that this book is not a revelation from God. 
(The New York Public Library has a catalogue of 
more than one thousand publications on "Mormons 
and Mormonism.") 

What, then, is the purpose of the Book of Mor- 
mon? The answer is — to declare to all men in all 
nations, that God, our Eternal Father, has revealed 
His Gospel for the joy, happiness, and peace of His 
children in this life and for eternal progress in the 
world to come. 

What is the need of the Book of Mormon? The 
World's Fair portrays the great and almost unbeliev- 
able advance of the human race in science, technol- 
ogy, art, education, religion, and all human activities, 
since the time when the immortal messenger told 
Joseph Smith that the time had come when the 
Spirit of God would be poured out upon all flesh. 
(See Doctrine and Covenants 95:4.) 

The expectancy of man's life has increased from 
about forty years to more than seventy years, and 
many years may not pass until it will be 85 years. 

By the turn of a button, we hear and see voices 
thousands of miles away. In a few hours we travel 
across our continent. We are obtaining knowledge 
from satellites in space. 

But, as the narrator of the World's Fair at Seat- 
tle declared after the state of Washington had shown 
by television the progress of science and technology 
in our modern world and predicted the future: "The 
insatiable hunger of the soul remains.^' 

Man remains the world's greatest mystery. Only 
by revelation from God and by evidence we can 
understand, can we know the facts of man's destiny. 

The greatest need of man is to know who he is, 
why he is here, and where he goes when life ends^ 
that he may live for his greatest happiness both in 
earth life and for eternity. 

The Book of Mormon, and the Restored Church 
of Jesus Christ is the answer today to man's search 
for happiness. However, "We believe all that God 
has revealed, all that He does now reveal, and we 
believe that He will yet reveal many great and im- 
portant things pertaining to the Kingdom of God." 
(Ninth Article of Faith, Church of Jesus Christ of 
Latter-day Saints.) 

2 "Doctrines of the Gospel" by Orson Pratt, The Juvenile In- 
structor, 1884, page 124. 
Library File Reference: Book of Mormon — Authenticity. 



DECEMBER 1964 



473 




** 



ELDER, 



Art by Dale Kilbourn. 



TALK TO GOD FOR ME . 



*9 



by Elder Marion D. Hanks 
of the First Council of Seventy 



Tommy was a choice boy, active and energetic 
and "full of beans," as the missionaries who visited 
his parents' home used to say. He was more than a 
year away from his twelfth birthday when I was 
his teacher, but we sometimes talked about his be- 
coming a deacon like his big brothers. He was anx- 
iously waiting for the day. 

The accident was a strange and tragic thing. 
Tommy and his friends were playing (as they should 
not have been) in an abandoned building where an 
old freight elevator had been stuck between floors 
for years. They had slid down the rusty cables 
from the upper floor and were standing on top of 
the elevator when, unaccountably, it slid a few feet 
down its shaft. Tommy was jostled against the wall 

(For Course 5, lesson of January 24, "Faith with Works"; for 
Course 13, lesson of February 28, "God Among Men"; for Course 17, 
lesson of January 17, "Meaning and Value of Faith"; and of general 
interest.} 



of the shaft and his foot and leg became caught be- 
tween the wall and the side of the elevator. When 
his frightened companions returned with help and 
Tommy was finally released, his leg was terribly 
torn and crushed and his life nearly gone. 

It was under these circumstances, facing the am- 
putation of his leg, that Tommy looked up at me 
from his hospital bed, his frightened, pale little 
face blending with the white sheets. With anguish 
in his eyes, he said, "Elder Hanks, talk to God for 
me. Tell Him I want to get up right now!" 

Before we administered to Tom we talked with 
him about the seriousness of his injury and explained 
that it would take time and skill and the blessings 
of the Lord to save his leg and make him well, and 
that we would ask Heavenly Father to bless him and 
help him that he might be man enough to endure 
the pain and torment and recover fully. He seemed 



474 



THE INSTRUCTOR 



to understand and accept this, and this is what we 
asked for as we prayed. 

Tommy did live, and his leg was saved. He was 
able to walk, run, and play again, and to participate 
in athletics when he grew older. I am not sure 
where he is now or what has happened to him or 
if he remembers what the Lord did for him, but I 
have never forgotten a 10-year-old who had enough 
confidence in his Heavenly Father to ask an elder 
to tell God he wanted to "get up right now!" 

How can youth find God? If they can be led to 
Him in their early years they will live the happier 
and more fruitful and more productive lives for it; 
if they do not become acquainted with Him while 
they are young they will be infinitely poorer for the 
loss of that ineffably important relationship, and 
may never find Him. 

Youth can be led to God by brothers, sisters, 
parents, and teachers who themselves know Him 
and who help boys and girls and young men and 
women enjoy that blessing. 

King Benjamin taught his people and us how to 
"grow in the knowledge of the glory of him that 
created you," in his marvelous instruction to his 
people. Said he: 

Believe in God; believe that he is, and that he 
created all things, both in heaven and in earth. . . . 
And again, believe that ye must repent of your sins 
and forsake them, and humble yourselves before 
God; and ask in sincerity of heart that he would 
forgive you; and now, if you believe all these things 
see that ye do them. (See Mosiah 4:9-12.) 

To believe that "God is," we must have spiritual 
assurance; and this we receive as we learn of Him 
and talk to Him and try to keep in tune with 
Him by doing what He has asked us to do. Search- 
ing the scriptures (with the help of parents and 
teachers and experienced companions) will help 
youth learn of God, of His goodness and love and 
His concern for us, of His instructions to all of His 
children through His prophets, of His program and 
plan and purposes for His beloved sons and daugh- 
ters. 



Sally was a 14 -year-old girl who had never 
heard of the Church. But after reading through the 
Book of Mormon, even against the advice of her 



minister and the wishes of her father, she was able 
to write: "After reading the Book of Mormon I 
know that God lives and I can really talk to Him 
and know that He is there and will help me." 

Benjamin supplies additional direction in three 
choice invitations: 

(1) "Humble yourselves even in the depths of hu- 
mility. . . ." 

The great prophet is suggesting that we recog- 
nize our need for God, our dependency upon Him, 
our helplessness in time of trouble without Him. 
He is telling us to accept our own vulnerability to 
weakness and sin and despair, and to learn to lean 
upon the Lord. At one of the most tragic places 
in history — the infamous concentration camp at 
Dachau — there is written near the gas ovens and 
the blood trench these unforgettable words: "Man 
cannot trust himself in the hands of man." 

(2) ". . . Calling on the name of the Lord daily." 

If young people will pray regularly, thoughtfully, 
humbly, going to a quiet place and talking out loud 
to Him, telling Him of needs and problems, of bless- 
ings and their love for Him, asking for forgiveness 
and surrendering their lives to Him without whom 
they cannot truly live, they will know of His reality, 
of His concern and love, of His direction in their 
lives. 

We knew an 11 -year-old boy named Jimmy at a 
YMCA camp many years ago. Jimmy said his first 
prayer out loud to the Lord in that camp, and then 
he went home and taught his family and others how 
to pray, and helped all of them change their lives 
and learn to love the Lord. 

(3) ". . . Standing steadfastly in the faith.' . ..." 
A boy or girl (or man or woman) who shows God 

that he is really trying to keep His commandments 
and live a decent, honorable life can be sure that 
the Lord will make known to him in many sweet 
ways that it is good to be obedient and steadfast 
in doing the will of the Lord. It is good to do good 
for others; it is good to serve and share and give. 

Thus, in honest search, sincere humility, humble 
prayer, and determined obedience there is a sure way 
to find God. The pure in heart will see God, and 
the peacemakers will be called His children. These 
are the most important blessings that man can 
achieve; they are infinitely worth the effort. 



Library File Reference: God and Man. 



DECEMBER 1964 



475 



IT was a warm, fall afternoon before my school 
year had begun; and I was going through the mo- 
tions of trimming shrubs in my front yard. Mostly, 
I was watching anxiously for my timid son to return 
from his first day at kindergarten. When he finally 
appeared in the distance, I was relieved and pleased 
to see that he was walking with another child who 
was obviously also returning from the same school. 
My son had found a friend; or, more accurately, the 
friend must have found him. I knew my son well 
enough to be sure that unless his first day at school 
had changed him completely, he would not have 
taken the initiative to make a new acquaintance. 

As the two boys came into the yard, the new 
friend eyed me closely and said, "You look more 
like Donald than anyone I've seen." Being a geneti- 
cist, I was not surprised to learn that my son and 
I resembled each other, but I was surprised to have 
a 5-year-old boy tell me so. Had he learned at his 
home and in other experiences of his early life to be 
observant and to speak-up to strangers, or was he 
born more forward and independent than my son? 
When I learned the boy's name, I realized that he 
was much like his outspoken, insurance-salesman 
father. By contrast, my son, alas, was even more 
like his retiring schoolteacher father than the friend 
had observed. Obviously, the two boys differed no 
more than did their fathers. 

In the past, people have argued vehemently 
about whether heredity or environment was respon- 
sible for the differences between people with respect 
to one or another trait. Now the question is un- 
realistic and sterile, although some people may yet 
argue about it. Both the biological information- 
carrying mechanism (heredity) and the influences 
exerted by a child's surroundings (environment) 



IMDlVlDuAL 

Differences 
in chilprem 



by Eldon J. Gardner* 

affect every trait. The importance of each factor is 
relative. 

Simple difference, however, may seem to depend 
far more on one of the factors than on the other. In 
a given environment for example, whether a child 
has blue or brown eye color may seem to depend 
almost entirely on certain genes. Judging from .the 
results of studies on experimental animals, how- 
ever, it might be possible to find or create an en- 
vironment which would have relatively more in- 
fluence on eye color. The personality trait in which 
my son differed so noticeably from his new friend 
may have been more dependent on his home envi- 



(For Course 25, lesson of February 14, "Infinite Variety"; and 
of general interest.) 



*Eldon J. Gardner received his B.S. and M.S. degrees from Utah 
State University in Logan. He was later awarded his Ph.D. from 
the University of California. He is presently on the teaching staff 
of USU. He has authored two books and has served among other 
Church positions as a bishop. Brother Gardner and his wife, the 
former Helen Richards, are parents of six children. 






1 



Cj 





476 



THE INSTRUCTOR 



ronment than was his eye color. The genetic informa- 
tion which came from his mother and me, however, 
also had much to do with his personality character- 
istics. 

The two boys on my front lawn had different 
sets of parents, and so it was to be Expected that 
they would differ in many ways. But what about 
children from the same parents? Unless they hap- 
pen to be identical twins (both of whom received 
essentially the same genetic information) they also 
may differ drastically from one another. My own 
six children, for example, all exhibit a degree of fam- 
ily resemblance, but each is a distinct personality. 
For instance, when each was about 5 years old, he 
could be characterized as follows: Patricia was talk- 
ative, sensitive, and socially oriented; Donald was 
timid, retiring, and independent; Betty was quiet, 
thoughtful, and good natured; Cynthia was tearful 
and fretful, but clever; Alice was quiet, studious, and 
adventurous; and Mary Jane was dependent, afraid, 
and lonely. Mrs. Gardner and I learned early that 
children cannot be expected to conform to the same 
pattern at home. They deserve and, indeed, require 
all the individual attention that parents can give 
them. 

Likewise, in school, none of our children fit into 
identical patterns. All went to the same schools and 
all came under the influence of the same teachers. 
Fortunately, the teachers were wise and patient 
enough to recognize individual differences. Parents 
or teachers who compare one child with another and 
insist that they all behave like robots from the same 
mold are being blindly unrealistic. Even more im- 
portant, by ignoring this patently self-evident obser- 
vation, they may severely damage a child's person- 
ality and over-all development. 

Parents and teachers must recognize that na- 
ture provides for an infinite variety of combinations 



of genetic units from two parents. And each child, 
even within a family, embodies an entirely different 
combination. Each child is different from all other 
children because each is made from a separate "blue- 
print." Only if they recognize individual differences 
can parents and teachers hope to create an environ- 
ment that will favor a child's developing to the full 
potential of his genetic endowment. Training (en- 
vironment) can improve a child's physical and func- 
tional characteristics, and even general intelligence 
(as measured by I. Q. tests). Genes define limits: 
environment determines whether the limits are real- 
ized. 

A thousand printed volumes would be required 
to carry all the information that is coded in the 
single fertilized cell from which a child develops. 
Even identical twins, who are formed from the initial 
union of a single sperm cell with a single egg cell, 
may be expected to accumulate a few "typographi- 
cal" changes (mutations) in the subsequent repli- 
cating process of the cells. Some of these alterations 
may even be evidenced by visible physical or per- 
sonality differences. 

Environmental effects are superimposed on the 
genetic blueprint. In effect, environment can either 
mute or give emphasis to a trait. A prime justifi- 
cation for the existence of teachers is the premise 
that children (and older people) are improvable. 
But various teaching devices differ in their effective- 
ness relative to each individual. 

Recognizing and accepting individual differences 
among children is a major duty of all of us who are 
parents and/or teachers. Working with these differ- 
ences so as to help each child attain his maximum 
potential is our major challenge. How we accept 
and meet this duty and challenge can vitally affect 
the futures of our children and our society. 

Library Pile Reference: Children. 




DECEMBER 1964 



Photos, Luoma and H. Armstrong Roberts. 

477 



Like Nephi, we can develop initiative with . . . 

Faitli, Diligence, and Work 



BY HENRY ALDOUS DIXON 



Several young people were overheard describing 
one of their associates as follows: 

"Oh, he's a brain. He has a new idea a minute. 
New ideas come to him in a flash without any effort 
at all." 

One could not help but discern in their remarks 
a tone of mixed envy and futility, just as if such 
brilliance and initiative were out of the question for 
them. 

The Prophet Lehi observed a similar attitude in 
his sons Laman and Lemuel toward Nephi when Lehi 
said to Laman and Lemuel, 

Awake, my sons; put on the armor of righteous- 
ness. Shake off the chains with which ye are bound, 
and come forth out of obsurity, and arise from the 
dust. Rebel no more against your brother, whose 
views have been glorious, . . . for were it not for him, 
we must have perished with hunger in the wilder- 
ness. ... (2 Nephi 1:23, 24.) 

Here Lehi referred to a situation in the wilder- 
ness which displayed Nephi's superior initiative. It 
appears that Laman and Lemuel had broken their 
bows. As a result, the families of Lehi and Ishmael 
became dependent upon Nephi and his bow for food. 
The same calamity befell Nephi. He writes: 

And it came to pass that as I, Nephi, went forth 
to slay food, behold, I did break my bow, which was 
made of fine steel; and after I did break my bow, 
behold, my brethren were angry with me because of 
the loss of my bow, for we did obtain no food. (1 
Nephi 16:18.) 

Nephi then tells us that the families were "much 
fatigued . . . [and] they did suffer much for want 
of food." They were so hungry and disheartened that 
Laman and Lemuel and even Lehi "did begin to 
murmur exceedingly," even against the Lord, "be- 
cause of their sufferings and afflictions." (See 1 
Nephi 16:19, 20.) 

Instead of standing around grumbling as the oth- 
ers did, Nephi made himself a bow of wood. And 
when the bow was completed he asked advice of his 
father as well as direction from the Lord as to 
where he should go to find game. The voice of the 
Lord told him to look into the ball. "And it came 
to pass that I, Nephi, beheld the pointers which 
were in the ball, that they did work according to 



the faith and diligence and heed which we did give 
unto them." (1 Nephi 16:28.) 

And it came to pass that I, Nephi, did go forth 
up into the top of the mountain, according to the 
directions which were given upon the ball. 

And it came to pass that I did slay wild beasts, 
insomuch that I did obtain food for our families. 

And it came to pass that I did return to our 
tents, bearing the beasts which I had slain; and now 
when they beheld that I had obtained food, how 
great was their joy! And it came to pass that they 
did humble themselves before the Lord, and did give 
thanks unto him. (1 Nephi 16:30-32.) 

Young people can learn from this striking ex- 
ample many of the important steps necessary to de- 
velop initiative. Now just what were the steps that 
Nephi took in supplying food? 

First. He was clearly conscious of the serious 
problem created by breaking his bow. 

Second. He resolved in his heart to solve this 
problem and supply food for his starving people. 

Third. He went to work. He cast about for ways 
in which to secure food. While he undoubtedly was 
a young man of superior intelligence and resource- 
fulness, the solution to the problem of the broken 
bow likely did not come to him "in a flash." On the 
contrary, he both worked and prayed; and he found 
that he received direction "according to the faith 
and diligence and heed" which he gave to the 
promptings of the spirit. 

Fourth. He experimented with various hypoth- 
eses or alternatives. Being unable to repair his steel 
bow, he sought and tested out various types of 
woods; and, he even made a slingshot. (See 1 Nephi 
16:23.) 

Fifth. He acted in the light of his best findings 
and "went forth into the top of the mountains" as 
directed and "did slay wild beasts" for food — and 
"how great was their joy!" 

Without even mentioning the story of Nephi, The 
Instructor asked Dr. Wynne Thome, Director of 
Utah State University Agricultural Experiment Sta- 
tion, if their research people appear to have proced- 
ures in common in their search for new ways to solve 
problems. His reply was in the affirmative. Note the 
great similarity in the steps taken by Utah State 
University agricultural research people to those tak- 
en by Nephi in the story of the broken bow. 



(For Course 9, lesson of January 31, "A Leader Is True to His 
Calling"; for Course 15, lesson of February 28, "To the Land of 
Promise"; and of general interest.) 



*Brother Henry Aldous Dixon is a member of the Deseret Sunday 
School Union General Board. 



478 



THE INSTRUCTOR 




Through vigorous work and often in spite of repeated 
blind alleys and failures, final triumph becomes assured. 



r Art by Harry Volk. 

Dr. Thome writes: "Most of our daily physical 
needs are met because men have recognized these 
needs, have had ideas for solving them, and have 
worked out practical solutions. These adventures of 
the mind are among the most stimulating endeavors 
that man undertakes; and, in observing them, we 
find that significant discoveries have much in com- 
mon. A problem exists and is recognized and clearly 
identified. Information is gathered, and one or more 
solutions proposed. Through vigorous work, often in 
spite of repeated blind alleys and failures, a final 
triumph is accomplished." 

Director Thorne supplied us with accounts of 
three extremely valuable research projects which 
support his statement that "significant discoveries 
have much in common." 

He writes: "In the early 1920's the wheat fields 
of the Intermountain region became infected with a 
fungus smut that turned the kernels to a black dust 
of spores. By 1927 over ninety percent of the inter- 
mountain wheat fields were affected, and disaster 
loomed for farmers and for people depending on 
bread. Delbert C. Tingey of Utah State University 
tackled the problem. He secured thousands of selec- 
tions of wheat from all over the world and tested 
them against smut. One was found to be resistant, 
but was a poor yielder and would not make good 
bread. He fertilized this wheat with pollen from a 
wheat of good quality and tested the progeny for 
disease resistance. The best wheats with disease 
resistance were again crossed with better quality 
wheats until the disease resistance of one parent suc- 
cussfully combined with the high yield and quality 
characters of the other parents. In the 1930's three 
wheats were released that saved the wheat crop of 
the Intermountain region." 

Dr. Thorne continues: "Man's activity in one line 
of business may interfere with enjoyment of life in 
another. The people of Utah and surrounding states 
rejoiced when a great steel plant was built in the 
central part of the state during World War II. But 
soon after the steel mill started production, crops 
such as apricots and plums in the vicinity displayed 



severely burned leaves. A little later many animals 
feeding on pastures in the vicinity became lame. Dr. 
D. A. Greenwood and Dr. M. L. Miner of Utah State 
University correctly diagnosed the problem as due 
to excess fluorine from the smoke stacks of the steel 
mill. A major research program was set up by the 
steel mill scientists together with scientists from 
Stanford University and Utah State University. 
Processes were found to absorb much of the fluorine 
from the smoke stacks. The influence of fluorides 
on plants and animals was studied in detail, and 
ways were found to reduce harmful effects. The 
successful continued operation of the steel plant is 
due to the discoveries of these scientists working 
vigorously against time. Plants which manufacture 
aluminum, bricks, and phosphate fertilizer have also 
used these findings. 

"The sheep industry of western United States 
depends on grazing large areas of land covered most- 
ly with sagebrush and other brushy plants. Often 
such range lands produce poor animals, and many 
of them die. Two Utah State University scientists, 
Dr. Lorin E. Harris and Dr. C. Wayne Cook, studied 
sheep grazing habits, identified the principal plants 
eaten, and made detailed studies of them and of 
the nutritional needs of sheep. They found that 
range plants are often deficient in phosphorus, pro- 
tein, and energy feeds; and they learned how to sup- 
plement feeds to make a nutritious diet. 

"These brief stories make discovery sound easy, 
but months and sometimes years of careful study 
were required by dedicated men who found satis- 
faction in what they were doing. They were men 
with clear-thinking minds and persistent, enthusias- 
tic endeavor toward a clearly defined goal, in spite 
of discouragement and frequent failure." 

In his summary statement and his three illustra- 
tions, Director Thorne makes it quite clear that 
initiative is as much the result of "perspiration" as 
"inspiration," and that a big part of the battle lies 
in following scientific procedure. Not only in agri- 
culture, but in business, in positions of leadership, 
and in all of the sciences, the most valued people 
are those who have the potential to exercise initia- 
tive. 



Library File Reference: Initiative. 



DECEMBER 1964 



479 



"AS I HAVE 
LOVED YOU 



** 



by Reed H. Bradford 

This is my commandment, That ye love one an- 
other, as I have loved you. {John 15:12.) 

How did the Saviour demonstrate His love? 

1. He made clear the main objective of our lives. 

"... I am come," He said, "that they might 
have life, and . . . have it more abundantly" {John 
10:10.) On another occasion He explained the great 
purpose in these words: "These things have I spoken 
unto you, that my joy might remain in you, and that 
your joy might be full." (John 15:11.) Or finally, 
He explained it this way: "For behold, this is my 
work and my glory — to bring to pass the immortality 
and eternal life of man." {Moses 1:39.) 

As parents, we can demonstrate our love for our 
children by doing everything we can to help them 
understand, love, and live the principles which will 
enable them to experience such joy, such salvation 
and eternal life. "And they shall . . . teach their 
children ... to walk uprightly before the Lord," 

(For Course 9, lesson of February 7, "A Leader Loves His Fellow- 
men"; for Course 13, lesson of March 21, "Jesus, the Redeemer": 
for Course 17, lesson of February 28, "God's Character"; for Course 
25, lessons of January 31 and February 7, "As the Twig Is Bent"; 
and for general reading.) 




Photo by H. Armstrong Roberts. 



As parents, we can demonstrate our love for our children by 
doing everything we can to help them understand and live 
principles of the Gospel which will give them lasting joy. 



was the way He stated it. (Doctrine and Covenants 
68:28.) There is no more effective way for parents 
to do this than by their daily behavior, which will 
be imitated in many ways by their children. They 
can also regularly and systematically try to com- 
municate the meaning of the basic principles of the 
Gospel. The Saviour indicated as much when He 
said that parents should teach their children "... to 
understand the doctrine of repentance, faith in Christ 
the Son of the living God, and of baptism and the 
gift of the Holy Ghost by the laying on of the 
hands. . . ." (Doctrine and Covenants 68:25.) 

Children can demonstrate their love for their 
parents by honestly listening to the wise counsel of 
their parents. They will then avoid having to learn 
through unnecessary suffering. 

2. He had a deep respect for all human beings, 
each and every one. 

There cometh a woman of Samaria to draw wa- 
ter: Jesus saith unto her, Give me to drink. . . . Then 
saith the woman of Samaria unto him, How is it that 
thou, being a Jew , askest drink of me, which am a 
woman of Samaria? for the Jews have no dealings 
with the Samaritans . {John 4:7, 9.) 

But He gave her water which "shall be . . a well 
of water springing up into everlasting life." (John 
4:14.) 

And when the scribes and Pharisees brought Him 
a woman who had committed a grievous sin and 
asked whether or not she should be stoned, He re- 
plied that he that was "without sin" should cast the 
first stone. Having guilty consciences, they all left; 
and finally He said to the woman: ". . . Neither do 
I condemn thee: go, and sin no more." (John 8:11.) 
He did not condone her sin, but neither did he re- 
ject her. He offered her the opportunity to repent. 

When He was upon the cross, shortly before His 
death, He looked at those who had terribly mis- 
treated Him and said: "... Father, forgive them; 
for they know not what they do. . . ." (Luke 2^3:34.) 
He said this because He truly loved them and thus 
did not wish to see them suffer. 

Each of us can have this same respect, this same 
concern, this same love for one another. We may 
differ in age, in experience, in wisdom, and in intelli- 
gence. But each of us is a child of the same Father 
in heaven. We are therefore brothers and sisters. 
We are brothers and sisters of the Saviour, too, and 
if we have His kind of love one for another, our 
aim will not be to "get even" when we are mistreat- 
ed. True, at such times we will feel sorrow, as He 
did when He said: 

O Jerusalem, Jerusalem, thou that killest the 
prophets, and stonest them which are sent unto thee, 



480 



THE INSTRUCTOR 



FIFTY-FIRST IN A SERIES ON GOSPEL TEACHING IN THE HOME 



how often would I have gathered thy children to- 
gether, even as a hen gathereth her chickens under 
her wings, and ye would not! {Matthew 23:37.) 

But in spite of our sorrow we will understand 
the meaning of His statement: 

. . . I say unto you, Love your enemies, bless 
them that curse you, do good to them that hate you, 
and pray for them which despitefully use you, and 
persecute you; that ye may be the children of your 
Father which isin heaven . , . . . (Matthew 5:44, 45.) 

3. He demonstrated a righteous kind of love for 
Himself. 

Concerning His youth we are told that He ". . . 
increased in wisdom and stature, and in favour with 
God and man." (Luke 2:52.) He said: "Ask, and 
it shall be given unto you; seek, and ye shall find; 
knock, and it shall be opened unto you." (Matthew 
7:7.) He instructed that one should "first seek to 
obtain" His word, before one sought to declare it. 
(See Doctrine and Covenants 11:21.) One has to 
have something to give before he can give anything 
to others. 

We, too, can grow in knowledge, understanding, 
skill, and wisdom, as well as in physical stature. 

4. He had an everlasting faith, trust, and love 
for His Heavenly Father and our Heavenly Father. 

In praying to our Heavenly Father shortly before 
His crucifixion, He said: "0 righteous Father 
... I have declared unto them thy name, and will 
declared it: that the love wherewith thou hast loved 
me may be in them, and I in them." (John 17:25, 
26.) 

As parents, we can come to realize more fully 
the meaning of the fact that our children are also 
children of our Heavenly Father; and we should 
treat them the way He would have us treat them. 
All of us, parents and children, can seek the guid- 
ance of our Heavenly Father, who, in turn, will make 
His influence felt in our lives. ". . . If a man love 
me, he will keep my words: and my Father will 
love him, and we will come unto him, and make our 
abode with him." (John 14:23.) 

5. He organized His Church that all men and 
women might be blessed by it. 

In His Church He placed His authority — the 
authority of the priesthood. Thereby it became pos- 
sible for the affairs of His Church to be conducted. 
Thereby, certain saving ordinances such as bap- 
tism and marriage for time and all eternity could be 
performed. Thereby, those who are baptized into 
His Church and who demonstrate integrity in living 
His teachings may receive the influence of the Holy 



Ghost. "But the Comforter, which is the Holy 
Ghost, whom the Father will send in my name, he 
shall teach you all things, and bring all things to 
your remembrance. ..." (John 14:26.) 

Each of us, regardless of whether he is old or 
young, can share in the blessings of the Church and 
help others to share. 

6. He voluntarily gave His life for everyone who 
comes into the world. 

Therefore doth my Father love me, because I lay 
down my life, that I might take it again. No man 
taketh it from me, but I lay it down of myself. . . . 
(John 10:17, 18.) 

He atoned for our sins and thereby made it pos- 
sible for us, in spite of our sins, to inherit the celes- 
tial kingdom of our Heavenly Father, if we repent 
and live His teachings. "But verily, verily, I say unto 
you, that as many as receive me, to them will I give 
power to become the sons of God. ..." (Doctrine 
and Covenants 11:30.) 

Each of us is not called upon to suffer a cruci- 
fixion, but each of us can make a personal commit- 
ment to the Saviour to live His teachings and to 
represent Him in all of our actions in the best way 
we know how. 

These are some of the ways we can demonstrate 
our love for Him, our Heavenly Father, and for one 
another. And in addition to the many blessings we 
will receive as a result of this kind of living, there 
is one other. He indicated it as follows: 

Peace I leave with you, my peace I give unto 
you: not as the world giveth, give I unto you. Let 
not your heart be troubled, neither let it be afraid. 
(JohnU:27.) 

May each of us love as He has loved us. 

Library File Reference: Love. 



AGENDA FOR HOME EVENING 

Hymn: "Sweet Is the Work, My God, My King," 
Hymns — Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day 
Saints, No. 168. 

Prayer. 

Lesson Discussion: "As I Have Loved You." 

1. Let someone read Luke 2: 1-20. 

2. Let each family member indicate some way in 
which the Saviour demonstrated His love for us. 

3. Let each family member indicate some specific 
way in which he might demonstrate his love for 
other family members. 

4. Perhaps someone might read or tell "The Story 
of the Other Wise Man," by Henry Van Dyke. 

Songs: Select some Christmas carols that the family 

especially enjoy and sing them. 
Prayer. 
Refreshments. 



DECEMBER 1964 



481 



They on the heights are not the souls 
Who never erred nor went astray, 

Who trod unswerving toward their goals 
Along a smooth, rose-bordered way. 

Nay! Those who stand where first comes dawn 
Are those who stumbled — but went on! 

- — Author Unknown. 



Candidates for Celestial Glory 

by Burl Shephard 



"Let's whistle!" 

With these instructions, Sunday School members 
at the Utah State Industrial School, Ogden, Utah, 
joined in whistling a verse of the hymn, "There's 
Sunshine in My Soul Today." It was fun! The words 
were unfamiliar, and many students had not been 
singing; but they enjoyed the unusual experience of 
a whistling song practice. And so did I! After that 
icebreaker, the singing improved markedly; there 
were more animated faces and more lips moving. I 
felt that these young people were anxious to be co- 
operative in any positive program that would help 
to solve their problems and bring them happiness. 

Who are they? They are, for one reason or an- 
other, temporary residents of a state school to help 
young people who have not been as fortunate as you 
and I. They are youngsters who have lacked the 
guidance, the understanding, and training to keep 
them progressing towards stable adulthood; and they 
have, therefore, strolled into devious paths of wrong- 
doing. At the Utah State Industrial School they 
receive help, and each Sunday they are required to 
attend a church service held there. I was a visitor 
one Sunday who could lead the singing in the Lat- 
ter-day Saint Sunday School. 

There are many impressive features in this spe- 
cial Sunday School — one which has been organized 
for at least thirty years. But organization-wise, it 
has made its greatest strides in the past two or three 
years under the leadership of President Milton Yor- 
gason and Stake Sunday School Superintendent 
Gordon Belnap, of Ben Lomond South Stake. The 
Sunday School now boasts a beautiful new organ, 
purchased with the help of the Church but also 
by collecting stamp books 1 from ward members 
in the 15 surrounding stakes. The organ has a 
beautiful and accomplished young lady to play it — 
Sharon Blair from the Seventh Ward of Lorin Farr 
(Ogden) Stake. She has served for more than two 
years. She also attends a Sunday School class there. 

On the subject of music, Superintendent Ken- 



iMany stores give stamps with purchases, and these can be 
redeemed in quantity for a variety of premiums. 

(For Course 9, lesson of March 28, "A Leader Has Courage To Do 
Right"; for Course 13, lessons of January 24 and February 21, "We 
Continue the Course" and "God, Author of Eternal Progression"; for 
Course 25, lessons of January 17 and 24, "Beliefs and Feelings"; and 
for general reading.) 



neth T. Burton, who has been Sunday School super- 
intendent at the State Industrial School for seven 
years, told me, "One of our greatest needs right now 
is for a chorister." Here, as in the teaching area, 
the need is for one who can inspire the students 
to participate, thereby giving the spiritual uplift 
that comes from learning to sing, hum — or whistle — 
the beautiful, the comforting, the strengthening, and 
inspiring hymns of the Church. Brother Talmadge 
Delange is doubling as teacher and chorister. Broth- 
er Burton's assistants are Weston W. Peterson and 
Delbert E. Beck. 

I was impressed with the good behavior of the 
Sunday School students. They do not whisper nor 
misbehave in any way. And teachers report the same 
is true in their classrooms. There is no rowdiness — 
teachers do not experience discipline problems. The 
students listen attentively. They participate. They 
want answers to their problems. Courses taught are 
from the regular Sunday School manuals, but there 
is much leeway to discuss the needs of the group. 

About 130 young people attend the LDS Sunday 
School; there are three classes for girls and seven 
for boys. Each class has two teachers. Each stu- 
dent may have a Book of Mormon and a New Testa- 
ment if he has indicated a desire to read them. A 
dedicated secretary and librarian, Sylvia Moore, has 
gathered and organized materials for the use of 
teachers. This, too, is an impressive accomplishment. 
Filmstrips and a projector are also in use. Each of 
the 15 stakes in the area donates ten dollars per 
year to an operating fund for this Sunday School. 
And two teachers are called from each of these 
stakes to teach at the state Sunday School for a 
period of two years. 

I was impressed with the devotion of the Sunday 
School teachers, some of whom, like Maurice R. Lee 
Thomas, Reed K. Swenson, and Noble Fishburn, 
have been teaching there since 1957; they continue 
in their assignment because it has been the most 
rewarding experience of their lives. But when I 
asked Superintendent Burton, "What is your great- 
est need?" he replied, 

"We always need good teachers! We need teach- 
ers who can make the lessons live, and teachers who 



482 



THE INSTRUCTOR 



are warmhearted and sympathetic to the young peo- 
ple. We require the best teachers that can be found 
in the stakes." His concern over this problem and 
the needs of the young people reminded me of some 
verses by Arthur James Hayden: 2 

If nobody smiled, and nobody cared, 

And nobody helped us along; 
If every fellow looked out for himself, 

And the good things all went to the strong; 
If nobody cared just a little for you, 

And nobody thought about me, 
And we stood all alone in the battle of life, 

What a dreary old world this would be! 

Life is sweet because of the friends we love, 

And the things that in common we share; 
And we want to live on, not because of ourselves, 

But because of the people who care. 
It's giving and doing for somebody else — 

On that all of life's splendor depends; 
And the joy in this world, when you've summed it 
all up, 

Is found in the love of our friends. 

The friends these youngsters have found in their 
Sunday School teachers have often saved them from 
returning to bad habits after being released from the 
School. Many of them are being taught to pray and 
to read scripture for the first time in their lives. They 
are being taught that the way to happiness in this 
life and eternal joy hereafter requires that they 
change from bad to good habits; that they learn to 
make decisions based on sound thinking rather than 
on emotion and impulse. They are being taught 
that the Lord has said, "Behold, he who has repent- 
ed of his sins, the same is forgiven, and I, the Lord, 
remember them no more." (Doctrine and Covenants 
58:42.) By this token, can any mortal afford to do 
less? This is important to these young people, 
for one of their greatest concerns is that they may 
not in future be accepted by their associates. 

However, it is important that in considering re- 
pentance they pay heed to the next statement of 
the Saviour: "By this ye may know if a man re- 
penteth of his sins — behold, he will confess them 
and forsake them." (Doctrine and Covenants 58:43.) 
On this subject, the Bible dictionary says, in part, 
that repentance ". . . denotes a 'change of mind,' that 
is, a fresh view about God, about oneself, and about 
the world." 3 Often it is this change in perspective 
which the young folks need so much, because most 
of them have not been taught in their earlier lives 
"to pray, and to walk uprightly before the Lord." 
(Doctrine and Covenants 68:28.) One of the boys, 
with the help of his teacher, prepared a 2 ^-minute 
talk designed to encourage his companions. He said: 

Have you ever seen an elephant in a zoo or a 
circus? These large animals are held down some- 



"Sunshine Magazine, October, 1962, page 16. 

3 As given in the LDS missionary edition of the Holy Bible. 



times only by a small chain attached to a short peg 
in the ground. Do you know why the elephant does 
not try to break away? The reason is this. 

An elephant is a very powerful animal. It is very 
difficult to capture one alive. Even after one is cap- 
tured, he must be held so he will not get away. He 
is chained with heavy chains to a large post that is 
driven far into the ground. The elephant will try 
with all his might to pull the post over and get free. 
He tries and tries, but it is no use. Finally he quits 
because he knows he cannot get away. The large 
chain and post are then replaced by a small one. 
The elephant still does not try to break the chain. 
Why? Because he thinks he cannot. 

We are like the elephant in the way that some 
of our bad habits bind us. We think we can't change 
and break away from them. But it only takes a little 
effort to change a bad habit to a good habit; just as 
the elephant could break his chain if only he wanted 
to. 

Many former students of the State Industrial 
School have broken the chains of bad habit and be- 
come well-adjusted citizens and good Latter-day 
Saints. One of them, now serving a full-term mis- 
sion for the Church, writes interesting and encour- 
aging words for his companions still climbing the 
ladder of repentance. He says: 

J might begin back when I was about 17 years 
old. Like everyone else in the School I didn't like it 
there, and I wanted to get out just as badly as every- 
body else. Although I did resent being there, in- 
wardly I told myself that I was going to make the 
best of the situation. 

For one reason or another I always looked for- 
ward to Sunday and being able to go to church again. 
It is surprising how much I, along with other Latter- 
day Saints, enjoyed going to Sunday School. . . . 
The teachers were always very kind and under- 
standing of our problems and often talked with us 
on matters we couldn't talk over with our case work- 
ers. There were times, while I was at the School, 
that I became very depressed and discouraged about 
life. Being able to attend Sunday School and listen 
to the lessons, 1 in which we discussed all the prin- 
ciples of the Gospel, not only gave me hope about 
the future but helped me to understand the Gospel 
and the Lord's love for His children. 

At times I felt that I was really lost and would 
never succeed in life's battle, but there was always 
something that told me not to give up but to keep 
going one more step. I began to realize the great 
challenge that I was up against. I knew that, some- 
how, some way, I was going to win the battle of being 
someone in life. . . . Although at the time I didn't 
have much faith, I knew that the Lord would help 
me grow into the person I wanted to be. . . . 

The way was finally opened up for me to go on a 
mission. It only came about because of my prayers 
and the prayers of many others. I can bear witness 
that the Lord does answer prayers because He has 
answered mine many times. . . . I have heard many 
people say, myself included, that it would be im- 
possible for me to be a missionary. I know that if 

(Concluded on page 484.) 



DECEMBER 1964 



483 



Tlie Spirit of Christmas 



Christmas is a time for reaffirming our faith in 
the brotherhood of man; in "Peace on earth, good 
will to men"; in the efficacy of the Golden Rule; 
in the Boy Scout slogan, "Do a good turn daily"; 
and in the Saviour's teaching, "Inasmuch as ye 
have done it unto one of the least of these my 
brethren, ye have done it unto me." (Matthew 25: 
40.) 

Should not the season of Christmas, 1964, be 
also the time for a rigid appraisal of our own lives 
— of the standards by which we actually live? 

It is a dark and sordid international and national 
picture which we face this Christmas time. This 
has stemmed from failure of men to live by Chris- 
tian standards, however they might profess to be- 
lieve in them. The correction of these conditions 
can come only by living the principles which Jesus 
taught. Is it not well for each of us to review our 
own lives in terms of these fundamental Christian 
teachings? Should we not say as did Joshua, "... 
As for me and my house, we will serve the Lord." 
(Joshua 24:15.) 



A great number of officers and teachers in the 
Sunday School have the true spirit of Christmas. 
They realize the truth of the axiom, "What you 
are rings so loudly in my ears that I cannot hear 
what you say." They live in such a manner that 
their students listen to them. The teachers have 
the love and confidence of the youngsters they teach 
so interwoven with their heart strings that there 
is no end to which the teachers would not go to 
enhance the testimony of the Gospel in the hearts 
and minds of their beloved charges. The response 
of the pupils is most gratifying. 

Members of the General Board of the Deseret 
Sunday School Union are deeply conscious of this 
devotion on the part of Sunday School leaders and 
pupils alike. For it they are humbly grateful. They 
would say to each of you, "God bless you. May He 
give you the true Spirit of Christmas and, through 
your humility, the desire, the willingness, and the 
ability to go the second mile." 

— General Superintendent George R. Hill. 



Library File Reference: Christmas. 



CANDIDATES FOR CELESTIAL GLORY (Concluded from page 483.) 



we are faithful and devoted to the work of the Lord 
and have an intense desire to serve Him, He will lift 
us up and make us equal to any calling we can ever 
receive. We are told in the Doctrine and Covenants: 
"Therefore, if ye have desires to serve God ye are 
called to the work." Through repentance and obe- 
dience to the laws and ordinances of the Gospel, we 
can overcome all things and become like God. 

If it is true, as a wise mother once said to her 
son, that "the greatest thing in life is the power to 



grow," then the greatest need in life is sincere re- 
pentance in order to keep growing. Eternal progres- 
sion is eternal life. Eternal life is celestial glory. 
The progressive pathway towards this goal is stated 
in the words of the missionary: 

/ kept putting one foot ahead of the other, until 
I finally came to realize the tremendous importance 
of life itself and how important it is to apply the 
principles of the Gospel in our lives. 

Library File Reference: Repentance. 



THE ACCLAIMED, 
HUMBLE BIRTH 

(Our Cover) 
No other birth has ever 
been so widely acclaimed. 
God's children both in heaven 
and on earth were notified of 
this unique event. "A multi- 
tude of the heavenly host" 



praised God. People in three 
widely-separated areas on 
earth were aware of its occur- 
rence — s hepherds "in the 
same country," "wise men 
from the East," and Nephites 
in the Western Hemisphere. 
His humble birth has affected 
more lives than has any other. 



Yet, where did it take place? 
In a manger. 

— Richard E. Scholle. 



(For Course 1, lessons of December 
13 and February 14, "Jesus Was a 
Baby When He Came Here To Live" 
and "Jesus Had a Family"; for Course 
la, lesson of February 14, "When Jesus 
Was Born"; for Course 4, lesson of 
December 20, "Christmas Lesson"; and 
of general interest.) 

Library File Reference: Jesus Christ, 
birth. 



484 



THE INSTRUCTOR 



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The Doubtful Thomas 

F. Donald Isbell 



THE STORY 

Kneeling before the Lord is one of the apostles, called Didymus, known as 
Thomas. He wears a red coat and a cloak of green, and an expression of sudden, 
unexpected joy. 

He cries: "My Lord and my God." (John 20:28.) 
Thus ends a time of confusion and unbelief among the apostles. 
Before the Lord's death they did not understand when He told them He would 
live again after three days. (Matthew 16:21, 22.) Later, when He was crucified, they 
were badly disillusioned because they had believed He would set himself up as a 
king, like the kings of men, conquering the Romans and making Israel the greatest 
nation on earth. (Mark 10:35-42; Luke 24:21.) After the Lord was dead, certain 
women of His followers reported His body missing from the tomb where it had been 
placed and said they saw a vision of angels. The apostles found the tomb opened 
and the body indeed gone, but they regarded the women's story as a mere fable. 
(Luke 24:1-12.) Finally, when two disciples who were not apostles came and said 
that they had walked and talked with the Lord, the apostles did not believe them. 
(Mark 13:16.) 

Thomas' confusion and doubt was no different from that of his fellow apostles 
before the Lord had manifested Himself to them. Thomas had not understood, as 
they had not, when the Lord spoke of becoming alive again after death; he (Thomas) 
had been disillusioned and sorrowful at the Lord's passing, as they all had been; he 
had considered the women's story of seeing angels as "idle tales"; and he had re- 
mained, therefore, as disturbed and unbelieving as the others. 

But when the Lord, after being in the tomb during three days, appeared to the 
apostles, Thomas was not there. He "was not with them when Jesus came." (John 
20:24.) 

Afterwards the apostles said to Thomas, "We have seen the Lord." 

. . . But he said unto them, Except 1 shall see in his hands the print of the nails, 
and put my finger into the print of the nails, and thrust my hand into his side, J 
will not believe. (John 20:25.) 

The Lord had appeared to the apostles on Sunday. 

A week passed. Again on Sunday, the Lord's day, the apostles were gathered. 
Thomas was with them this time in the "upper room" where the doors were locked 
against officials of the Jews who were themselves mostly responsible for the Lord's 
death. 

. . . Then came Jesus . . . and stood in the midst [of the apostles] and said, 
Peace be unto you. Then saith he to Thomas, Reach hither thy finger, and behold 
my hands; and reach hither thy hand, and thrust it into my side: and be not faith- 
less, but believing. (John 20:26, 27.) 



(For Course 5, lesson of January 17, "Faith in Things Not Seen"; for Course 17, lesson of January 17, "Mean- 
ing and Value of Faith"; and of geneial interest.) 



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The Doubtful Thomas 



THE STORY (Concluded) 

As we behold Thomas in the painting, we see that he now knows the Lord is 
alive again — not as a shade from out of Sheol — the place of departed spirits, the 
Jews believed 1 — but as they (the apostles) knew Him when He was with them in 
mortality. 

Thomas' confusion is ended. His unbelief is turned into belief. His joy is over- 
flowing. 

As he and the other apostles were confused and even unbelieving of what the 
Lord tried to teach them before His death, they are now suddenly unified in the 
knowledge to which they will all testify; they have seen the living Lord after His 
death. 

One other thing. As is indicated in the expression on the Lord's face, His 
manifestation to Thomas is not entirely comforting. Says the Lord Himself to the 
man: "Thomas, because thou hast seen me, thou hast believed: blessed are they 
that have not seen, and yet have believed." (John 20:29.) 

This declaration of the Lord to Thomas is not intended for him alone, but for 
the other apostles also — and for every follower of Christ. In this message is hope 
for all men everywhere who would believe in Christ. 



1 Henri Daniel-Rops, Daily Life in the Time of ]esus; The New American Library of World Literature, Inc., New 
York, 1964; page 321. 



THE PICTURE 

The 19th Century painter, Karl Heinrich Bloch — a Dane — is the artist of 
The Doubtful Thomas. The work was probably executed during the last few years 
of Bloch's life, as one among the "Twenty-two Scenes from the Life of Christ" 1 
which he accomplished. 

The background is dark — no doubt as the best device applicable for presenting 
the Lord in the foreground. There is deep saturation in the colors, which also is 
agent to the same effect. 

The realism in the expressions of the bearded faces brings vividly before us the 
subject of the scene. One can almost hear Thomas — bowed down, beholding the 
hole in the Lord's foot — utter, "My Lord and my God." One waits to hear the 
Lord's kind but firm admonition to Thomas thereafter. 

The fact that the characters are bearded might indicate the attitude of the 
artist toward the historicity of the event. It seems that Bloch is suggesting that as 
realistically as appear the mortals with the Saviour, thus appears the Saviour Him- 
self to them. There is no mysticism attempted in the painting, no play of vain imag- 
ination. The work is direct and to the point — an easy guide to follow in one's study 
of the resurrection of Christ. 



1 Cyclopedia of Painters and Paintings, Volume I; Charles Scribner's Sons, New York, 1905; page 166. 
LIBRARY FILE REFERENCE: Jesus Christ — Resurrection and Ascension. 



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■■■■■ 




THE GIVING OF THE LAW 



ART BY ARNOLD FR1BERG. 



GREAT WORDS TO LIVE BY 

A Picture Story on the Ten Commandments — by Marie F. Felt 



It had been three months since the Israelites 
left Egypt, under the guidance and protection of 
God. They had traveled far and long, and it had 
not been easy. Sometimes food was scarce and some- 
times even water could not be found. At such times 
there were people who grumbled and spoke unkindly 



(For Course 8, lesson of December 13, "Israel and Idol Worship"; 
for Course 9, lesson of February 21, "A Leader Cooperates with God"; 
for Course 3, lesson of February 28, "Prophets Carried on the Work"; 
and of general interest.) 



about Moses and even about God, our Heavenly 
Father. In the main, however, the people loved and 
trusted God. They were grateful for His great kind- 
ness and protection. They were grateful, also, for 
Moses, their leader, through whom God spoke to 
them. 

One day they came to the great desert of Sinai. 
Here they pitched their tents. This was a special 



DECEMBER 1964 



485 



place, for right before them was the great mountain 
called Mount Sinai. Some people called it "The 
Mountain of the Lord." 

"And Moses went up unto God, and the Lord 
called unto him out of the mountain. ..." (Exodus 
19:3.) He told the Israelites, through Moses, ". . . 
If ye will obey my voice indeed, and keep my cove- 
nant, then ye shall be a peculiar treasure unto me 
above all people. . . . And ye shall be unto me . . . 
an holy nation." (Exodus 19:5, 6.) 

When Moses came down from the mountain and 
told the people what God had said, all the people 
answered together, ". . . All that the Lord hath spo- 
ken we will do. And Moses returned the words of the 
people unto the Lord." (Exodus 19:8.) 

When the Lord heard what the people said, He 
told Moses to go again to the people. He was to 
tell them to wash their clothes and be ready, for on 
the third day the Lord would come down in the 
sight of all the people upon Mount Sinai. 

"And Moses went down from the Mount unto 
the people . . . and they washed their clothes." 
(Exodus 19:14.) 

"And Moses brought forth the people out of the 
camp to meet with God; and they stood at the nether 
[lower] part of the mount." (Exodus 19:17.) 

"And the Lord came down upon Mount Sinai, on 
the top of the mount: and the Lord called Moses up 
to the top of the mount; and Moses went up." (Ex- 
odus 19:20.) 

Then God spoke these words which he wanted 
the people always to remember. They are called His 
Ten Commandments; and this is what He said: (See 
Exodus 20:1-17.) 

"Thou shalt have no other gods before me. 
"Thou shalt not make unto thee any graven im- 
age. . . . 

"Thou shalt not take the name of the Lord thy 
God in vain. . . . 

"Remember the sabbath day, to keep it holy. . . . 

"Honour thy father and thy mother. . . . 

"Thou shalt not kill. 

"Thou shalt not commit adultery. 

"Thou shalt not steal. 

"Thou shalt not bear false witness against thy 
neighbour. 



"Thou shalt not covet . . . anything that is thy 
neighbour's." 

Moses then came down and told the people the 
words of the Lord and the judgments; and the peo- 
ple answered and said, ". . . All that the Lord 
hath said will we do, and be obedient." (Exodus 24: 
7.) 

Then the Lord invited Moses to come again to 
Him. He said, ". . . Come up to me into the mount, 
and be there: and I will give thee tables [tablets] 
of stone, and a law, and commandments which I 
have written; that thou mayest teach them." (Exo- 
dus 24:12.) God wanted to be sure that the Israel- 
ites would always have these commandments with 
them to help them remember to do the things which 
He wanted them to do. They would be a happier 
people always, He knew, if they did. 

HOW TO USE THE PICTURE 

In this issue of The Instructor are small pictures 
of "Moses Breaks the Tables of the Law." These are 
for distribution to the students. 

The pictures may be mounted on construction 
paper before they are given to the children, or they 
may be placed directly in the students' Sunday 
School scrapbook. Paste should be applied to only 
one edge of the picture so that the picture can be 
raised for reading and reference to scriptures printed 
on the back. 

The teacher may wish to use the large pictures 
previously published in The Instructor to supple- 
ment this story. The first two are Standard Pub- 
lishing Company pictures: "Moses," published Au- 
gust, 1950; and "Moses Receiving the Tablets," pub- 
lished July, 1951. 

The Sunday School picture packet of "The Ten 
Commandments," by Arnold Friberg, is available at 
Deseret Book Store, Salt Lake City, Utah, for $1.50. 
Three of these have been published as center spreads 
in The Instructor, as follows: 

"Moses Receives the Ten Commandments on 
Mount Sinai," April, 1958. 

"The Children of Israel Worship the Golden 
Calf," May, 1958. 

"The Three Ages of Moses," July, 1958. 

Library File Reference: Ten Commandments. 



486 



THE INSTRUCTOR 




Junior Sunday School 



Bind Your Pictures into Booklets 



There are several ways to bind pictures into 
booklets. The usual procedure is to mount the 
pictures on single or double pages and then fasten 
them together. 

A loose-leaf binder is the simplest form. Stan- 
dard binders may be obtained at school supply or 
stationery counters. Many inexpensive covers, 
such as those used by students for fastening themes 
and journals, can be purchased ready for mounting 
your pictures. Or you may choose colored paper 
or a durable paper that requires the holes to be 
punched. (See Figures 1 and 2.) 

Any size pages may be stitched together using 
a darning needle threaded with twine, strong string, 
or yarn. Construction paper makes a good cover. 
Hold the pages securely and sew with a few large 



stitches, or more smaller ones. Measuring and 
marking on the cover the place for the holes makes 
this a simple task. 

A few double sheets of paper can easily be sewn 
together. Later, pictures may be labeled with titles 
or explanatory sentences. (See Figures 3 and 4.) 

An accordion booklet is an interesting and easy 
way to display several pictures at one time. 1 Use 
cardboard or chip board stiff enough to stand when 
fastened. Accurately cut pages the size you need. 
Pages are fastened with %-inch or inch masking 
tape, or self-sticking cloth tape. Leave enough 
space between sheets to allow them to bend either 
way. (See Figure 5.) — LornaC. Alder. 

J This method limits use of the pictures to one person at a time. 
It is recommended only when a duplicate set of pictures is already in 
the library picture file, properly mounted. 
Library File Reference: Teaehers and teaching. 




When mounting a picture leave a 

larger space at the bottom than at 

the top or sides. This gives a better 

looking picture. 



DECEMBER 1964 



487 



Superintendents 



Stake board officers and advis- 
ors are regarded by youngsters in 
each ward in the stake as examples 
of all that is expected of Sunday 
School attenders. 

In most wards and branches of 
the Church, the visit to the Sun- 
day School by stake board advis- 
ors is a great event; and the vis- 
itors are watched as they enter. 
These are no ordinary visitors. 
Every movement, every word is 
watched. The reverence of such 
visitors is observed by nearly the 
entire membership of the school, 
and the behavior of the stake 
board members is copied by 




The Privilege of 
Stake Board Service 



younger members of the school. 

Occasionally, though not often, 
some stake board members indulge 
in conversation with other stake 
board advisors or with members of 
the ward during the worship serv- 
ice, little realizing that every act 
is being copied by the members of 
the Sunday School. One ward 
that prides itself as being one of 
the most reverential wards in the 
Church recently complained to me 
of the disregard of stake board 
members who were visiting the 
school and conversed with one an- 
other and with ward members dur- 
ing the worship service and even 



during the administration of the 
sacrament. 

My comment was that these 
stake board members must have 
been recent appointees who did 
not realize the exemplary position 
that this appointment conferred 
upon them. I told them that gen- 
erally stake board members are 
among the most exemplary mem- 
bers in the Church and often are 
regarded as highly as General 
Authorities. 

— General Superintendent 
George R. Hill. 



Library File Reference: Sunday Schools — Mor- 
mon — Local leadership. 



Answers to Your Questions 



May Prayer Meeting Conflict with 
Priesthood Meeting? 

Q. Is it advisable to hold a 
prayer meeting in conflict with 
priesthood meeting? 

— Ogden Stake. 

A. The General Handbook of In- 
structions, No. 19, page 50, states 
that "No other Church meeting 
should be held to conflict with the 
priesthood meeting." It has been 
our recommendation to bishops 
and stake presidents that the 
priesthood meeting be held at such 
time that it may adjourn at least 
25 minutes prior to the commence- 
ment of Sunday School. This af- 
fords time for a Sunday School 
prayer meeting without interfer- 
ence. 

Should Ward Meetings Be Held 
During Sunday School? 

Q. Should ward meetings other 
than Sunday School classes be held 
during Sunday School? 

A. It is our recommendation to 
bishops and stake presidents that 
other ward meetings should not be 
held during Sunday School. Such 



a practice tends to set a bad ex- 
ample. Stake Sunday School offi- 
cers and board members are urged 
to be in attendance at ward Sun- 
day Schools on Sundays and not 
to hold stake meetings during Sun- 
day School. 

May Nonmembers Be Appointed 
Chorister or Organist? 

Q. Is it permissible for the bish- 
op to appoint a nonmember of the 
Church as a chorister or organist? 
— Big Horn Stake. 

A. The bishop of the ward is 
responsible for the Sunday School. 
All teachers are called by the bish- 
op; the superintendency may rec- 
ommend. Often times the holding 
of the position of chorister or or- 
ganist affords a good opportunity 
to encourage a nonmember or in- 
vestigator to study the Gospel. 

Who Offers Words of Welcome and 
Makes Announcements? 

Q. Who offers the word of wel- 
come and makes the announce- 
ments in Sunday School, the bish- 



op or the Sunday School superin- 
tendent? — Denver Stake. 
A. The ideal Sunday School has 
a transition from the devotional 
prelude to the opening hymn with- 
out any word of welcome or an- 
nouncements by either the bishop 
or the superintendent. If the bish- 
op wishes to vary from the ideal, 
it is his prerogative; and he has 
the right to say whether he should 
make the announcements and word 
of welcome or whether this right 
should be delegated to the super- 
intendent. It should never be nec- 
essary for both the bishop and the 
superintendent to stand at the pul- 
pit at the beginning of Sunday 
School. Certainly either the bishop 
or the superintendent can perform 
all of this work. We have seen some 
very effective bishops delegate all 
of this functioning to the superin- 
tendent. If the bishop is not pres- 
ent at the time Sunday School is 
scheduled to start, it is the re- 
sponsibility and duty of the super- 
intendent to commence Sunday 
School. 

— General Superintendency. 



488 



THE INSTRUCTOR 



Advancement Schedule, January 3, 1965 



1964 

COURSE 

NUMBER 

1964 SUBJECT 

1. A Gospel of Love 1 

1. A Gospel of Love 



2. Growing in the Gospel, Part I. 



4. Living Our Religion, Part I. 



6. What It Means To Be a Latter-day Saint >. 

8. Old Testament Stories >. 

10. The Life of Christ >. 

12. The Church of Jesus Christ in Ancient Times > 

14. The Message of the Master ^ 

16. The Gospel Message— ^ 



1965 

COURSE 

NUMBER 

1965 SUBJECT 

1. A Gospel of Love. 1 

la. Beginnings of Religious Praise. 2 

3. Growing in the Gospel, Part II. 

5. Living Our Religion, Part II. 

7. History of the Church for Children. 

9. Scripture Lessons in Leadership. 

11. History of the Restored Church. 

13. Principles of the Restored Church at Work. 

15. Life in Ancient America. 

17. An Introduction to the Gospel. 



NOTE: Except from Course 1, group promo- 
tions out of the class should not be made. The 
entire class is given the new course subject as 
indicated by the arrow. Teachers and class- 
rooms may be changed. 



Children nearly three and three years old. 

includes from Course 1 only those children who will be four 
years old by Jan. 1, 1965. 

3 Open to those who have not heretofore attended this course. 



Elective Courses for Adults in 1965 

21. Genealogical Research — A Practical Mission. 3 

23. Teaching the Gospel 

( Teacher Training — Restricted) . 

25. Parent and Child (Family Relations). 

27. Patriarchs of the Old Testament 
(Gospel Doctrine class). 

29. A Marvelous Work and a Wonder (Gospel Es- 
sentials). See The 1964 Sunday School Hand- 
book for membership. 



Memorized Recitations 



for Feb. 7, 1965 
Students from Courses 9 and 15 
should recite in unison during the 
Sunday School worship service of 
Feb. 7, 1965, scriptures listed be- 
low for their respective classes. 
Students should memorize these 
scriptures during the months of 
December and January. 

Course 9: 

(In this short verse Jesus ex- 
plains the vital need for baptism.) 

"Jesus answered, Verily, verily, 



I say unto thee, Except a man be 
born of water and of the Spirit, 
he cannot enter into the kingdom 
of God." — John 3:5. 

Course 15: 

(From this Old Testament pas- 
sage we learn that the Lord does 
speak to His children here on the 
earth.) 

"Surely the Lord God will do 
nothing, but he revealeth his secret 
unto his servants the prophets." 

— Amos 3:7. 



COMING EVENTS 

Dec. 20, 1964 
Christmas Worship Service 

• • • 

Jan. 3, 1965 

Pupil Advancement; 

New Courses Begin 

• • • 

Jan. 17, 1965 
100 Percent Sunday 



DECEMBER 1964 



489 



A Teacher's Goal - 



THE TEACHER 

Lord, who am I to teach the way 
To little children day by day, 
So prone myself to go astray? 

I teach them KNOWLEDGE, but I know 
How faint they flicker and how low 
The candles of my knowledge glow. 

I teach them POWER to will and do, 

But only now to learn anew 

My own great weakness through and through. 

I teach them LOVE for all mankind 
And all God's creatures, but I find 
My love comes lagging far behind. 

Lord, if their guide I still must be, 
Oh, let the little children see 
The teacher leaning hard on Thee. 

— Leslie Pinckney Hill. 

This humble yet profound poem should be a 
guide for all who accept teaching positions in The 
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. To 
be a teacher in this Church you must lean heavily 
on the Lord through prayer while preparing and 
giving lessons in order to reach the goal of this 
teaching, i.e., inspiring the learner to live near to the 
Lord, to keep His commandments, and to realize his 
potential. Regardless of the subject or the age- 
group being taught, your lessons will soon be for- 
gotten unless they DO inspire the individual to 
greater faith and works. 

Just how, then, does a teacher go about making 
his lessons inspirational? Let us divide the problem 
into several areas of concentration: (1) Preparing 
lessons, (2) Teaching individuals — not the group, 
(3) Providing a classroom atmosphere conducive to 
learning, and (4) Sustaining the interest of students. 

Preparing Lessons 

It is a sound pedagogical truism that unprepared 
or half-prepared teachers rarely teach good lessons. 
In fact, their teaching is often more harmful than 
beneficial. Gospel teachers will find that physical, 
mental, and spiritual energy must be expended in 
utilizing the following steps in lesson planning: 

I. Plan what you want to achieve during the 
lesson period: 

A. Long-range or course objectives. 

B. Immediate objectives for today's lesson. 

C. Students' minds prepared to be receptive. 
II. Translate these objectives into meaningful 

attainments. 



A. What effect does the material have upon 
the student? 

B. What single message will he take away 
from this discussion? 

III. Fortify yourself with necessary materials: 

A. Mastery of subject matter. 

B. Use the germane and meaningful illustra- 
tion and experience, etc. 

C. Purposeful teaching techniques, e.g. lec- 
ture, storytelling, directed questions, vis- 
ual aids, panel discussion, etc. 

IV. Arrange material in logical sequence so it will 

fit together naturally: 

A. Review briefly previous lesson. 

B. Present new lesson material. 

C. Summarize and pinpoint main ideas of 
lesson. 

D. Preview interesting factors for the com- 
ing lesson. 

V. Seek divine assistance early and consistently. 

Teaching Individuals— Not the Group 

People can be taught in groups only when the 
individual is reached, for learning is something that 
happens only within the individual person. Whether 
any person in a class learns depends on forces that 
are unique to him, together with a valid reason for 
learning. Seldom should you teach subject matter 
for the sake of subject matter. It must be meaning- 
fully interpreted for the benefit of each individual. 

As you contemplate each lesson, keep in mind 
such things as the age, sex, maturity (physical and 
mental), environment, ambitions and ideals, hered- 
ity, etc., of the students whom you teach. If you 
maintain a current and accurate record of each stu- 
dent, and use these factors as a basis for your 
entries, you will not only get to know each pupil 
better but such a procedure will help make each 
class a period of individualized inspirational activity. 

Providing a Classroom Atmosphere Conducive To 
Learning 

As a Gospel teacher you encounter an entirely 
different classroom situation from that of the regu- 
lar schoolteacher in such things as attendance; 
teacher-to-student, student-to-teacher, and student- 
to-student relationships; and methods of teaching, 
to mention just a few. 

You, the teacher, and not the student, must 
create the teaching climate in the classroom. Almost 



490 



THE INSTRUCTOR 



Inspired Teaching! 



any class leader can learn enough subject matter to 
"get by," but it takes a real teacher to provide a real 
learning situation. 

1. Are the physical surroundings comfortable 
and attractive? 

2. Do you encourage a relaxed and friendly 
(emotional) climate, yet one in which students re- 
spect your position as their instructor? 

3. In directing the lesson activities, do you mo- 
tivate the individuals so that they will want to 
achieve the purposes of the class? 

4. Is the class student-centered instead of 
teacher-centered, and do you make use of the psy- 
chology of individual participation? 

5. Even though they are individuals, do you 
teach students how to think in terms of "this is our 
class"? 

A positive answer to these questions will help 
ensure an inspiring classroom atmosphere. 

Sustaining the Interest of Students 

When a student consistently demonstrates an 
eagerness to attend a particular class, it is generally 
because there is something there that interests him. 
It may be his friends, the subject, or the teacher. 
What should you do to present inspiring lessons 
while maintaining or creating this student advert- 
ence? 

You should: 

(1) Be interested yourself in the subject under 
consideration. 

(2) Have the subject so well in mind that you 
can maintain eye contact with the students 



The Deseret Sunday School Union 



and devote your attenton to their every re- 
action and need. 

(3) Use your voice to the best advantage. 

(4) Dress so that your appearance, and also 
your bearing, will add to and not detract 
from the presentation. 

(5) Bear your personal testimony regularly of 
the truth of the Restored Gospel. 

A Final Word 

The opportunity and attendant responsibility of 
working towards, and ultimately reaching, the goal 
of inspired teaching in The Church of Jesus Christ 
of Latter-day Saints is one that every member 
could, and should, experience. WHY? 

The late Dr. Howard R. Driggs — himself a noted 
educator: — succinctly answered this when he wrote: 

"Here is a calling that puts one's skill in teach- 
ing to a real test. It offers no monetary pay, yet 
brings the richest of rewards; for God is the king of 
paymasters. He enriches every soul who works de- 
votedly in His cause. He multiplies the good that 
is done by the fruitage of better thoughts and more 
kindly deeds in others inspired by the teacher's 
work. Prayerful preparation and devotion are the 
best assurance of success in this loving service." 1 



toward R. Driggs, The Master's Art; Zion's Printing and Pub- 
lishing Company, Salt Lake City, Utah, 1946; page 66. 

*Brother Sterling R. Provost is on a leave of absence as a 
speech, theology, and English instructor at The Church College of 
Hawaii. He has been a teacher and principal with the LDS De- 
partment of Education, a special instructor in speech and English, 
and a Seminary area coordinator. He received his B.S. and M.S. 
degrees from the University of Utah and has recently returned to 
Brigham Young University to continue work on his Ed.D. Brother 
Provost is married to Florence Beverly Smith. They have two chil- 
dren. 
Library File Reference: Teachers and teaching. 



by Sterling R. Provost 



George R. Hill. General Superintendent 
David Lawrence McKay, First Assistant General Superintendent; Lynn S. Richards, Second Assistant General Superintendent; 
Wallace F. Bennett, General Treasurer; Paul B. Tanner, Assistant General Treasurer; Richard E. Folland, General Secretary 

MEMBERS OF THE DESERET SUNDAY SCHOOL UNION BOARD 



George R. Hill 
David L. McKay 
Lynn S. Richards 
Wallace F. Bennett 
Richard E. Folland 
Lucy G. Sperry 
Marie F. Felt 
Gerrit de Jong, Jr. 
Earl J. Glade 
A. William Lund 
Kenneth S. Bennion 
J. Holman Waters 
H. Aldous Dixon 
Leland H. Monson 
Alexander Schreiner 
Lorna C. Alder 
A. Parley Bates 



William P. Miller 
Vernon J. LeeMaster 
Claribel W. Aldous 
Eva May Green 
Melba Glade 
Addie L. Swapp 
W. Lowell Castleton 
Henry Eyring 
Carl J. Christensen 
Hazel F. Young 
Florence S. Allen 
Beth Hooper 
Asahel D. Woodruff 
Frank S. Wise 
Clair W. Johnson 
Delmar H. Dickson 
Clarence Tyndall 



Wallace G. Bennett 
Addie J. Gilmore 
Camille W. Halliday 
Margaret Hopkinson 
Mima Rasband 
Edith M. Nash 
Minnie E. Anderson 
Alva H. Parry 
Bernard S. Walker 
Harold A. Dent 
Paul B. Tanner 
Catherine Bowles 
Raymond B. Holbrook 
Joseph Fielding Smith, Jr. 
Lorin F. Wheelwright 
Fred W. Schwendiman 



Lewis J. Wallace 
Clarence E. Wonnacott 
Lucy Picco 
Arthur D. Browne 
J. Roman Andrus 
Howard S. Bennion 
Herald L. Carlston 
O. Preston Robinson 
Robert F. Gwilliam 
Dale H. West 
Bertrand F. Harrison 
Willis S. Peterson 
Greldon L. Nelson 
Thomas J. Parmley 
Jane L. Hopkinson 
Oliver R. Smith 



G. Robert Ruff 
Anthony I. Bentley 
Mary W. Jensen 
John S. Boyden 
Golden L. Berrett 
Marshall T. Burton 
Edith B. Bauer 
Elmer J. Hartvigsen 
Donna D. Sorensen 
Calvin C. Cook 
A. Hamer Reiser 
Robert M. Cundick 
Clarence L. Madsen 
J. Elliot Cameron 
Bertrand A. Childs 
James R. Tolman 



Richard L. Evans, Howard W. Huntek, Advisers to the General Board 



DECEMBER 196 4 



491 



«* 



What a Joyful Sound! 



99 



Senior Sunday School Hymn for the Month of February 




Hymn: "Welcome, Welcome Sabbath 
Morning"; author R. B. Baird; com- 
poser, Ebenezer Beesley; Hymns — 
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day 
Saints, No. 190. 

Robert Bell Baird was born in 
Glasgow, Scotland, in 1855. He 
came to America, settling in Wil- 
lard, Utah, about the year 1863. 
Not long thereafter, Evan Steph- 
ens, author and composer of many 
other Latter-day Saint hymns, was 
also living in Willard. The two 
young men no doubt knew each 
other well, because Evan Stephens 
there began his great career in 
music; and Brother Baird was 
leader of the Willard Ward choir. 
He also taught music in the schools 
of Willard. 

Ebenezer Beesley was born in 
Oxfordshire, England, in 1840. He 
immigrated to Utah in 1859. Later 
he was director of the Salt Lake 
Tabernacle choir for more than 
nine years. 

Here we have an old-time song 
from the earliest days of our Sun- 
day Schools when only children 
attended and the sacrament was 
not a part of the meeting. 

The text indicates that we are 
singing happily to one another, 
welcoming each other to that best 
of all places on Sunday morning. 
While the words are not addressed 
directly to our Heavenly Father, 
nevertheless we may be reminded 
that we are singing them before 
the presence of the Lord, in His 
house of worship, and on His holy 
day. 

The suggestions of the Psalmist 
are applicable here: "Make a joy-i 
ful noise unto the Lord, all ye 
lands. Serve the Lord with glad- 
ness: come before his presence 
with singing." (Psalm 100:1, 2.) 



"Let the saints be joyful in glory: 
let them sing aloud. . . ." (Psalm 
149:5.) 

To the Chorister and Organist 

The analysis of this music brings 
to light some interesting features. 
It was written as a children's duet 
— boys and girls — with the boys' 
voices as yet unchanged. It was 
not meant for four-part singing, 
for choirs, nor for four-part con- 
gregational singing. 

First of all, let no man sing an 
alto part ever, because an alto 
sung an octave too low is an un- 
pleasant sound. It is not musical. 
This means then that all men 
should sing either the melody or 
the bass, and this latter is quite 
uninteresting and droning. The 
alto part is then only available to 
the ladies' voices. 

Second, the melody lies rather 
high; truly too high with our pres- 
ent-day high-pitched pianos and 
organs. It should therefore be 
transposed down to the key of C. 
This will make a wonderful proj- 
ect for organists. The results will 
be well worth their effort. 

Third, if you really are eager to 
achieve this "holy loudness" of 
sound, put all the men's voices to 
singing the melody, along with the 
sopranos. All the great composers 
have understood and practiced 
this principle in their expressions 
of the most kindly feelings. When 
Tschaikowsky produced his strong- 
est sounds, he kept his melody 
afloat by having it sung by the 
second violins, an octave higher by 
the first violins, and an octave low- 
er by the cellos. This simultaneous 
melody in three octaves produces 
a luscious effect. In brass band 
pieces, the melody is often sung 



not only by the clarinets and 
trumpets at the soprano level, but 
it is also supported by the eu- 
phonium and even occasionally by 
the trombones, an octave lower. 
The results are startlingly beauti- 
ful. 

Today, it appears that ladies 
everywhere prefer to sing gently 
after the pattern of that lovely 
lady, Annie Laurie, whose voice 
was soft and low. Such mild voices 
do not produce sufficient volume 
for a worthwhile soprano melody. 

Therefore, if you wish to achieve 
real power in your singing of this 
hymn, do it in the key of C, and 
let everyone sing the tune. Let 
the organ carry the harmony. In 
unison there is strength — and for 
power in congregational voices this 
is achieved by one tune in unison 
and octaves. 

— Alexander Schreiner. 



(The Senior Sunday School hymn for the 
month of March will be "Choose the Right"; 
Hymns, No. 110.) 



But the Spirit Giveth Life 

Choristers and organists of the 
Church are in large part respon- 
sible for the fine spirit of our Lat- 
ter-day Saint meetings. The first 
thing we hear upon entering the 
chapel is preludial music. As a con- 
gregation, we unitedly raise our 
voices in song at the beginning of 
the meeting. These two musical 
activities help to establish a spirit 
of worship, praise, and instruction. 
The sacramental hymn leads us 
into the most sacred portion of the 
service. And finally, the closing 
hymn prepares us for the closing 
prayer. A s musicians in the 
Church we have a great responsi- 
bility to see that our hymns are 

(Continued on page 495.) 



492 



THE INSTRUCTOR 



Junior Sunday School Hymn for the Month of February 



Hymn: "An Evening Song"; author, 
Maryhale Woolsey; composer, Russian 
Folk Song, arranged by Frances G. 
Bennett; The Children Sing, No. 136. 

Many children form the valuable 
habit of saying a bedtime prayer. 
The importance they attach to this 
regular communication with their 
Father in heaven often determines 
how significant prayer becomes as 
they develop attitudes about re- 
ligion. "An Evening Song" can 
help them develop worthwhile hab- 
its and attitudes about evening 
prayer. 

The message you should want 
the children to receive in this 
song is that they need and should 
ask for divine protection while 
they sleep. The assurance that 
someone all powerful is watching 
over every boy and girl with ten- 
der care ought to help them feel 
secure and have restful sleep. 

To the Chorister: 

Verse two of this hymn gives the 
complete message of bedtime 
prayer and its importance in four 
phrases. Therefore, teach only the 
second verse. It is such a simple, 
childlike song that you should en- 
courage most regular attenders at 
Junior Sunday School to partici- 
pate by singing; thus they will feel 
the joy of group participation. 

The words are from a child's 
vocabulary, with one exception. 
"Ere," the first word in verse two, 
could be confusing. Many children 
will likely confuse "ere" with "air." 
You need to explain that "when" 
means the same as "ere" in this 
instance. 

The melody is simple but quiet 
and soothing. Phrases one and 
three are identical, while phrases 
two and four are nearly alike. This 
makes only two very short tunes 
to remember. 

Be sure you memorize it in or- 
der to sing it with sincerity and 
expression when you present it to 



children. Then, if some children 
have learned it previously, they 
will enjoy hearing it when you in- 
troduce it as the song to be prac- 
ticed. 

To the Organist: 

This lovely song with a lullaby 
rhythm could be played as part of 
a prelude the month before it is 
used as the hymn of the month. 
Choose a prelude that will fit with 
"An Evening Song" without mak- 
ing an abrupt change in the key 
or tempo. Practice playing one 
and then the other so that you can 
fit them together smoothly. Play 
the accompaniment as it is written 
when you use it during the pre- 
lude; but when you begin to play 
it for children to sing, omit the 
harmony played by the right hand 
so that children can hear the mel- 
ody more distinctly. When many 
of the children are singing in tune, 
add the harmony for variety and 
interest. 



Play the notes of each chord 
simultaneously, or you will change 
the intended rhythm, causing the 
selection to sound ragged. 

Possibly the word "articulately" 
is placed at the beginning of 
this selection because many times 
the accompanist, trying to play 
softly and smoothly where there 
are many repeated notes, tends to 
hold the previous sound instead of 
repeating it. If you plan the cor- 
rect fingering, you will change fin- 
gers on repeated notes and thus 
eliminate loud, jerky playing; yet 
every repeated note will be heard. 

You will set the mood for this 
song when you play it as a prel- 
ude. Practice it enough so that it 
will be artistically done and chil- 
dren will enjoy hearing and sing- 
ing it. 

— Mary W. Jensen. 

(The Junior Sunday School hymn for the 
month of March will be "Come, Follow Me," 
The Children Sing, No. 60.) 



February Sacrament Gems 

For Junior Sunday School For Senior Sunday School 

Jesus said, "Ye are my friends, "And by the power of the Holy 
if ye do whatsoever I command Ghost ye may know the truth of 



you 



«i 



iJohn 15:14. 



all things." 2 



2 Moroni 10:5. 



Organ Music To Accompany February Sacrament Gems 



Darwin K. Wolford 




I 



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J^T^j jg> 



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Wij' I r n 



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^2= 



Ui J J 



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1* 



l 



DECEMBER 1964 



493 



UNDERSTANDING STUDENTS' 
INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES 




Art by Dale Kilbourn 



by Neat A. Maxwell* 

Again, the kingdom of heaven is like unto a net, 
that was cast into the sea, and gathered of every 
kind. (Matthew 13:47.) 

Editor's Note: This teacher improvement lesson is part 
of a series which relates to the 1964 Sunday School Confer- 
ence theme, "We'll Keep a Welcome." Sunday School 
General Board members are visiting stakes during the 
1964 Quarterly Conferences to give further instructions 
about this theme. All stake board advisers and mission 
supervisors are urged to keep these articles for future ref- 
erence. Ward and branch officers and teachers in the Sun- 
day School are requested to study and apply the principles 
presented in this series. Thus, a Church-wide effort to 
keep a welcome will be presented through all Sunday 
Schools during the 1964-65 year. 

Jesus' analogy is a needed reminder of the end- 
less variety of individuals we encounter in the king- 
dom. In addition to all the individual differences 
which secular teachers encounter, we teachers of re- 
ligion must deal with an added source of differences: 
the levels of spirituality among students "of every 
kind." 

A Church classroom may contain: some who are 



Teacher Improvement Lesson 
for February, 1965* 

bored; some who are making an unobserved but ag- 
onizing and crucial reappraisal of their relationship 
to the Church; some who are single-shot visitors who 
may base future attendance on a sample Sunday; 
some who are "acting out" their rebellion against 
parents or the Church; some whose idealism has 
soured, and a goodly number of "saddle-broken," 
well-informed members. To be impersonal or to use 
the indiscriminate approach to teaching with such 
inevitable variety is not to be "anxiously engaged" 
in the teaching cause. Casual, insensitive teaching 
means that we see ourselves merely as a tollgate 
through which members must pass. Such teaching 
will be heedless of individual differences and devoid 
of warmth. 

We may check on our own attitudes which affect 
our efforts to individualize instruction by using sev- 
eral tests. First, do we have an image of our class 
which is over-simplified? Because groups often set 
norms for classroom learning, we may wrongly as- 
sume that surface "sameness" in behavior indicates 
an absence of variety. Second, do we wrongly as- 
sume silence is consensus? Third, do we naively 
assume equivalency in the level of Gospel prepara- 
tion of our students? Fourth, do we particularize in 
our comments to or praise of individual students? 
Fifth, do we seek simply to fill students with facts 
as described in this verse? 

Ram it in, 

Jam it in, 

Students heads are hollow. 

Ram it in, 

Jam it in, 

There's plenty more to follow. 
Students come to us with varying "here-and- 
now" needs. Some need affection or friendship more 
immediately than theology. Some almost defy us 
to teach them — yet there is often a way: 

He drew a circle that shut me out — 
Heretic, rebel, a thing to flout. 
But Love and I had the wit to win: 
We drew a circle that took him in! 

— Edwin Markham. 
Individuals often behave in accordance with their 



*Neal A. Maxwell was appointed in September as vice president 
of student and public affairs at the University of Utah. He grad- 
uated in 1952 with honors from that institution. He received his 
master's degree in political science. 



*See also "The Fruits of the Gospel," by Elder Richard L Evans, 
page 470; and "A Teacher's Goal — Inspired Teaching!" by Sterling 
R. Provost, page 490. 



494 



THE INSTRUCTOR 



EIGHTH IN A SERIES ON "WE'LL KEEP A WELCOME" IN SUNDAY SCHOOL 



self-image. How they perceive themselves (as being 
smart, as being bored by the scriptures, as enjoying 
Church life, as being a child of God, etc.) exerts tre- 
mendous pull on their actual behavior. This makes 
it imperative that we know our students well enough 
to be sensitive to each one's self-image. 1 A student's 
perception of himself can be an aid in terms of the 
teaching situation. Greater sensitivity to students' 
self-images would aid us in assessing the actual 
meaning of what we are saying insofar as individuals 
are concerned. Obviously, the correlation between 
students' self-concepts and learning places a pre- 
mium on our knowing, as well as loving, our students. 

Students' antennae are more sensitive than we 
know, not just in terms of the warmth of our per- 
sonal welcome, but also as regards whether or not 
their ideas "matter" to us, the teachers. They are 
more sensitive than we know in terms of assessing 
our capacity or willingness to let them get their 
doubts out on the table where such doubts can be 
dealt with effectively and supportively within the 
climate of the Kingdom. 

So much depends also on our seeing a restless or 



1 See "Insights into We'll Keep a Welcome," article and chart by 
Anthony I. Bentley; The Instructor, September, 1964; page 372. 



rebellious student with some sense of the student's 
potential. Pericles urged the ancient Athenians to 
contemplate Athens "not alone for what she is, but 
for what she has the power to become." Believing in 
an individual, as he may become, may be, at times, 
the only deterrent to despair. 

Since inter-generational differences between 
teacher and student are normal, we are wise teachers 
if we can legitimatize "feedback," so that pupils, 
individually, or as a group, feel free to talk candidly 
with us concerning the degree to which the course 
is meeting their individual spiritual needs. It is hard 
to see how we can follow the Master's counsel to 
"feed my sheep," when often we do not know what 
the differing needs of those "sheep" are. A par- 
ticular portion of the Gospel is always relevant to 
any "here and now" life situation, and part of our 
teaching task is to be relevant in the teaching mo- 
ment. 

Finally, our ability to welcome and to individual- 
ize is basically a test of our capacity to love, and 
our students will quickly assess whether our love is 
"love unfeigned." 

Library File Reference: Teachers and teaching. 



BUT THE SPIRIT GIVETH LIFE (Continued from page 492.) 



played, conducted, and sung in the 
finest manner possible. 

We can look at our hymns from 
two points of view. First there is 
what we might call the "mechani- 
cal" side of a hymn. For the chor- 
ister this concerns learning the 
words, the melody and other voice 
parts; learning the correct con- 
ducting patterns; observing tempo, 
dynamics, fermatas and ritards; 
and deciding on appropriate verses 
and interludes; in other words, 
knowing the "letter" of the hymn. 
Under the "letter" of the hymn, 
the organist is interested in many 
of the same things, plus such items 
as finger and pedal problems, reg- 
istration, and appropriate intro- 
duction. 

The other item in preparation is 
the "spirit" of the hymn. What 
impression is the hymn supposed 
to create? What can be done to 
help the congregation catch the 



spirit of words and music? First of 
all, the congregation will catch the 
spirit of a hymn more readily if it 
is not aware of the mechanical ac- 
tivities of the chorister and organ- 
ist. Everything mechanical should 
be worked out before Sunday 
morning, so that the chorister can 
then concentrate on the spirit of 
the hymn with the congregation. 

1. Do you, as chorister, choose 
your hymns early (in the week or 
month) , notifying your organist of 
your choices and discussing such 
things as number of verses, wheth- 
er or not to have interludes, cor- 
rect tempo, and other items to 
give the music its best possible 
presentation? 

2. Are you sufficiently prepared, 
when you conduct a hymn, that 
you seldom have to refer to your 
hymnbook and can give your at- 
tention to the congregation, guid- 
ing it in its mood and encouraging 



the members to express their de- 
votion and praise through their 
singing? 

3. In conducting a practice 
hymn, do you really know it thor- 
oughly? Do you follow a carefully 
thought out plan of presentation? 
Do you point out places to be cor- 
rected, encourage everyone to try 
it again, and praise them when it 
is well done? 

4. Do you show your love for 
the music of the Church by giving 
it all of the attention and devotion 
it deserves? Are you magnifying 
your calling, catching the spirit of 
it, and infusing a spirit of worship 
into the members of your ward or 
branch through their musical par- 
ticipation? 

— Ronald D. Pexton.* 

♦Ronald D. Pexton is a graduate assistant 
in the music department at the University of 
Utah. He received his B.S. degree from that 
institution. He has completed graduate work 
at Brigham Young University and the U. of U. 
Library File Reference: Sunday Schools— Mor- 
mon — Music. 



DECEMBER 1964 



495 




AN URGENT, 
LATTER-DAY 

MISSION 

by Archibald F. Bennett* 

The impressive and beautiful Oakland Temple, 
erected at great cost and by the united effort of 
hundreds of thousands, has received widespread at- 
tention and has focused interest on the question, 
"Why do Latter-day Saints build temples?" 

In the 13 temples now to be in operation there 
will be administered annually over one million en- 
dowments for the dead, as well as baptism and seal- 
ing ordinances. Why do faithful Church members 
engage so devotedly in this mission to redeem their 
kindred dead? 




The latest report of the microfilm department of 
the Genealogical Society, dated July 1, 1964, shows 
an amazing total of 374,647 rolls of filmed genea- 
logical records, equivalent to 1,789,276 volumes of 
300 pages each, or 536,782,700 pages— well over half 
a billion pages! These records come from the various 
states of the Union and from more than eighteen 
foreign countries. This microfilming program con- 
tinues in full force. Again the question is asked, 
"Why do Latter-day Saints spend millions of dollars 
gathering records of genealogical value throughout 
the world?" 

The recently completed construction of a mam- 
moth Church Records Vault in solid granite at the 
mouth of Little Cottonwood Canyon near Salt Lake 
City, with an area of 65,111 square feet, including 
six storage-vault rooms with an area of 28,616 square 
feet, for the storage of negative record films already 
and yet to be gathered, once again provokes an im- 
posing question. Particularly so, when it is noted 
that the negative films now on hand and stored 
there occupy only a tiny fraction of the total space 
provided. Why was this done? 

All the world is rapidly beginning to realize that 
the Church has built up through the years and is 
maintaining, for the use of all, the greatest center of 
genealogical sources in existence. The Library is 
free and open to the public every day except Sunday, 
and frequently between 400 and 500 searchers a day 
are eagerly engaged in searching out the records of 
their forefathers. The Genealogical Society of the 
Church, a service organization, operates with a staff 
of about five hundred employees. Why? 

The answer to all these related questions is sim- 
ple and direct. As a cardinal principle of their re- 
ligion, Latter-day Saints believe in the eternal 
continuity of family relationships for the faithful, 
after death and the resurrection. In the highest 
heaven of the celestial kingdom perfected individuals 
will be organized into perfect families, linked to- 
gether in patriarchal, celestial order. For those who 
would qualify for this eternal life, the greatest gift 
of God, certain ordinances of exaltation must be per- 
formed — baptism, endowment and sealings — as pro- 
vided for in the Lord's plan of happiness. Provision 



(For Course 21, lesson of February 14, "Learning What Has Been 
Done"; and of general interest.) 

* Brother Archibald F. Bennett is employed by the Genealogical 
Society as assistant librarian over branch libraries. 



4% 



THE INSTRUCTOR 



is made for the living to receive these essential ordin- 
ances, by proxy, for their forefathers and kindred 
who are dead. 

But in order for this to be done in valid manner, 
the dead must be truly and adequately identified, 
both as individuals and in their complete families. 
This makes genealogical research to secure needed 
names, dates, places, family relationships a respon- 
sibility for all who have accepted the Gospel. By 
divine commandment each member of the Church 
is required to do his utmost in this great mission of 
this last dispensation. 

Under the direction of the First Presidency, the 
Genealogical Society was organized to gather and 
make available the records of ancestors of Church 
members, and to assist tha living in finding and prov- 
ing records of the families of their departed pro- 
genitors. 

At the Genealogical Society they may first con- 
sult the Information Center, where they will be 
helped to analyze their research problem and plan 
out their research endeavors. Through attendants 
in this department they may gain indirect access to 
the Temple Index Bureau with its 27 million cards 
bearing ordinance dates and information about their 
earliest known ancestors. 

They should next consult the Archives with its 4 
million family group records, alphabetically arranged. 
These reveal what others may have already done in 
research and temple work. Patrons should also reg- 
ister their family lines and the research they have 
performed with the Pedigree Referral Service. Both 
of these services enable one to avoid needless dupli- 
cation of research and temple work, and to cooper- 
ate and join forces with other relatives in seeking 
common ancestors. 

At the Reference Department in the Genealogical 
Library are experienced personnel to aid the public 
in finding and utilizing guide and reference books, 
and in using wisely the card catalog file, and in in- 
terpreting what patrons find in the books and films 
they study. 

There are numerous rich sources to be consulted 
in the Library, such as Church records — ward and 
branch records, quorum records, the card index to 
patriarchal blessings, Nauvoo baptisms for the dead, 
etc. There are thousands of compiled family gen- 
ealogies and the most vast collection of place records 
to be found anywhere. 



Those who would achieve success in this pains- 
taking and thorough research, utilizing all available 
sources, must be inspired by an unfaltering zeal and 
fervent desire. Said President Heber J. Grant: "It 
is a matter of having the desire. If you get it into 
your heart and soul that this is one of the most im- 
portant things you as Latter-day Saints can do, you 
will find a way to do it. That is the one lesson of 
all others that I would like to impress upon you." 1 

This work is of great urgency. The Prophet Jo- 
seph Smith taught that we can become saviors on 
Mount Zion by receiving the various ordinances and 
sealing powers upon our heads, in behalf of all our 
progenitors who are dead, and ". . . redeem them 
that they may come forth in the first resurrection. "- 

President . Wilford Woodruff emphasized this 
same truth: 

"We are bordering upon the millennium. We are 
living in the great and last dispensation, in the which 
the God of Israel expects us, his servants, his sons 
and daughters, to perform the work which has been 
left to our charge. It is our duty to build these tem- 
ples. It is our duty to enter into them and redeem 
our dead. . . . Our forefathers are looking to us to 
attend to this work. They are watching over us 
with great anxiety, and are desirous that we should 
finish these temples and attend to certain ordinances 
for them, so that in the morning of the resurrection 
they can come forth and enjoy the same blessings 
that we enjoy. . . . 

"I look upon this portion of our ministry as a 
mission of as much importance as preaching to the 
living; the dead will hear the voice of the servants 
of God in the spirit world, and they cannot come 
forth in the morning of the resurrection, unless cer- 
tain ordinances are performed, for, and in their 
behalf, in temples built to the name of God. , . . 

"This is a preparation necessary for the second 
advent of the Saviour. . . . When the Saviour comes, 
a thousand years will be devoted to this work of re- 
demption; and temples will appear all over this land 
of Joseph — North and South America — and also in 
Europe and elsewhere. 



"3 



iPower from on High, Genealogical Society of Utah (Lesson Book 
iqqq Fourth .par Junior Genealogical Classes), Salt Lake City, Utah, 

^Teachings of the Prophet Joseph Smith, compiled by Joseph 
?™ Smith; Dese »" et Book Company, Salt Lake City, Utah, 1958; 

a The Discourses of Wilford Woodruff, edited by G. Homer Dur- 

,™ n ', B o 0okcraft Com Pany« Salt Lake City, Utah, 1946; pages 149, 150, 
160, 163, 

Library File Reference: Genealogy. 



DECEMBER 1964 



497 



THE INSTRUCTOR 1964 INDEX 

(Listed by titles, subjects, authors, and illustrations) 

KEY TO ABBREVIATIONS 

(C) Chart (P) Poetry (M) Map (S) Song 

Page numbers preceded by "C" are from Conference Edition. 

TITLES, SUBJECTS, AUTHORS 



Page 



Aaronic Priesthood Restoration: 

On a Morning in May, Marie F. Felt 269 

Aaronic Priesthood: 

Ross Becomes a Deacon, Margaret P. Childs 212 

Abraham, Beloved of God, Marie F. Felt 67 

Abraham — Friend of God.....Centerspread article, January 
Acclaimed, Humble Birth (Our Cover), 

Richard E. Scholle 484 

Adamson, Jack H.; John Milton and Mormon Doctrine.. 16 

Advancement Schedule (C) 489 

Advantages of Regular Sunday School Attendance, 

George R. Hill 233 

Adventures of the Spirit: Joseph Fielding Smith, 

David W. Evans Center spread, April 

Adventure Next Door, 

Wendell J. Ashton Outside back cover, November 

Alder, Lorna O; Bind Your Pictures into Booklets 487 

Alder, Lorna C; 

Their Talks Are Your Assignment, Too 441 

Aldous, Claribel W.; 

Families Help To Build Places of Worship 86 

Aldous, Claribel W.; Inspirational Talk, The 189 

Allen, Florence S.; Junior Sunday School Hymn of Month 

"For the Beauty of the Earth" 31 

"We Give Thee But Thine Own" ... 75 

"How Lovely Are the Messengers" 116 

"Oh, How Lovely Was the Morning" 156 

"Come, Come, Ye Saints" 195 

Allen, Mark K.; Developing Self-Control 340 

Allen, Phyllis S.; 

A Family Follows the Path of Paul 376 

Am I Giving Wise Counsel to My Children? 

Reed H. Bradford - 182 

". , . And Always Remember Him," Arthur R. Bassett....459 
"And Thus Was the Gospel Preached to the Dead," 

Joseph F. Smith 294 

Anderson, Joseph; When a Man Is Called of God 302 

Anderson, Minnie E.; Angel to the Papagos 301 

"An Evening Song," Mary W. Jensen ...493 

Angel to the Papagos, Minnie E. Anderson 301 

Answers To Your Questions — Lynn S. Richards 
May Sunday Schools Dismiss from Classes? 
Who Helps the Stake Board Worker? 

How Should Double Sessions Operate? 29 

How Often Should Juniors Be Promoted? 

Do We Need More Than One Investigators' Class... 71 

May Students Select Subject Material for Talks? 

Is Enlistment Work Correlated with Home Teaching? 

Who Is Responsible for Sacrament Administration?.. 112 

Are Absent Members Counted Present? 

Is "Passing the Hat" Permissible? 153 

Superintendents' Council Meeting Reports 
How Can Junior Sunday School 

Prayer3 Be Improved? 191 

Should Testimonies Be Given in Worship Service? 
Should Teen-agers Be Called as Teachers? 

May Teen-agers Attend Genealogy Class? 231 

Has Sunday School Class Organization 
Been Abolished? 

How Are Total Enlistment Contacts Noted? 313 

Are Class Recreations Permitted? 399 

Who Gives Teacher-training Lessons? 

Who Initiates Ward Faculty Meeting? 443 



Page 

May Prayer Meeting Conflict with Priesthood 

Meeting? 
Should Ward Meetings Be Held During 

Sunday School? 
May Nonmembers Be Appointed Chorister or 

Organist? 
Who Offers Word of Welcome and 

Makes Announcements? 488 

Apostasy: Gentile Christianity and the Fellowship 

of God, A. Burt Horsley 240 

Appreciation of Our Sunday School Manuals, 

George R. Hill - 271 

Arrival of the Mormon Missionaries, The; 

Center spread, August 

Art of Praise, The; 

Wendell J. Ashton Outside back cover, March 

Ashton, Wendell J.; Outside back cover articles 

Summit of Life January 

By the Golden Gate February 

Art of Praise, The March 

Tallest Living Things April 

What Kind of Egg? May 

Glow and Grow — June 

Problems or Challenges July 

Let Us Reason Together August 

Birds in the Bush September 

He Was a Hero Where He Lost October 

Adventure Next Door November 

Timing - - December 

Ashton, Wendell J.; Quest for Humility, The 52 

As I Have Loved You, Reed H. Bradford 480 

As with the Priest^-So with the People; George R. Hill..230 

A Time and a Place, Reed H. Bradford 348 

Atlanta, Growth of the Church in; William L. Nicholls....200 

Atonement: Fall and the Atonement, The; 

Richard O. Cowan 128 

At One with God, Anthony I. Bentley 50 

Attendance: Habit of Perfect Attendance, 

George R. Hill 419 

Authority: Church Government Yesterday and Today, 

Richard W. Maycock .. 208 

Authority: For Authorized Personnel Only, 

Theodore M. Burton . r 180 

Authority: When a Man Is Called of God, 

Joseph Anderson 302 

B 

Babies: Joys of Having a Baby in the Home, The; 

Hazel West Lewis - 360 

Bagley, Vivian and Poison, Barbara; 

Meeting the Needs of Course 1 Children 144 

Baker, Frances; Romance from an Old Account Book .... 20 
Bassett, Arthur R.; ". . . And Always Remember Him"..459 

Bauer, Fred; The Faded, Blue Blanket .-. -.397 

Be of Good Courage and He Shall Strengthen 

Your Heart, David O. McKay 45 

Benevolence of the Church, Alberta Huish Christensen..404 
Bennett, Archibald F.; An Urgent Latter-day Mission ....496 

Bennett, Evalyn Darger; Happiest Mother's Day 94 

Bennion, Howard S.; Released with Appreciation: 

Edgar B. Brossard 211 

Bennion, Kenneth S.; Cover Articles 

Fun for the Family 37 

I See Growing Things 57 

Where Hibiscus Bloom 113 

When Shall We Teach? 153 



498 



THE INSTRUCTOR 



Page 

Bennion, Kenneth S.; How Long Shall I Honor 

My Mother? 458 

Bennion, Kenneth S.; How To Avoid Offending 

Class Members 274 

Bennion, Lowell L.; Jesus the Christ , 38, 80, 120 

164, 196, 242, 285, 322, 368, 408 

Bentley, Anthony L; At One with God 50 

Berrett, Caroline Kimball; Respect the Rights of Others..252 
Berrett, William E.; Leadership for the Lord's Purposes..380 

Bible: How Our Bible Grew, Marie F. Felt -351 

Bible: Most Famous Book in the World, The; 

Blaise Levai 314 

Bickerstaff, H. George; Those Who Rebelled 432 

Bind Your Pictures into Booklets, Lorna C. Alder 487 

Birch, Joyce Sainsbury; Letter To My Mother, A 175 

Birds in the Bush, 

Wendell J. Ashton Outside back cover, September 

Bishop, The: A Father to His People, 

Robert L. Simpson 282 

Blanket, The Faded, Blue; Fred Bauer 397 

Bogan, Samuel D.; The Mysterious Visitor 414 

Book of Mormon, Why the? Francis W. Kirkham 472 

Book review: Angel to the Papagos, 

Minnie E. Anderson 301 

Bowring, Benjamin L.; Temples for Christlike Service.,216 
Bradford, Reed H. — Gospel Teaching in the Home series 
How Do I Teach My Child To Accept 

Responsibility? 18 

How Shall I Forgive Another? 62 

What Do I Do If My Child Seems Indifferent 

to the Gospel? 106 

When a Loved One Passes Away 146 

Am I Giving Wise Counsel to My Children? 182 

My Mission 222 

This Hour and This Day .. ..-262 

The Sensitive Line 306 

A Time and a Place 348 

Where Is My Treasure? ...392 

The Diamond and Its Imitation 436 

As I Have Loved You 480 

Brossard, Edgar B.: Released with Appreciation, 

Howard S. Bennion 211 

Brotherhood, We Can Export; Lenore Lafount Romney..298 

Budget Fund and Its Collection 272 

Buehner family: "Commit Thy Way unto Him," 

Burl Shephard 384 

Building: Families Help To Build Places of Worship, 

Claribel W. Aldous 86 

Burton, Marshall T.; Young People Have Courage, Too.,308 
Burton, Theodore M.; For Authorized Personnel Only. -180 

Burton, Theodore M.; Why Genealogy? 434 

But the Spirit Giveth Light, Ronald D. Pexton ...496 

By the Golden Gate, 

Wendell J. Ashton Outside back cover, February 

C 

Cameron, J. Elliot; How To Meet a Newcomer 232 

Cameron, J. Elliot; We Have the Right To Choose 131 

Candidates for Celestial Glory, Burl Shephard 482 

Cannon, Mark W.; How The Instructor Helps Me 25 

Carlston, Herald L.; Prayer: The Doorway to 

Revelation 184 

Catalog: Key to the Library, Delbert E. Roach 248 

Celestial Happiness, A Family's Plan for; 

J. Ballard Washburn 390 

Center Spread Articles 

Abraham — Friend of God January 

Eliezer and Rebekah, F. Donald Isbell February 

Christ Taken Captive March 

Joseph Fielding Smith April 

George R. Hill May 

Christ Healing the Blind Men of Jericho June 

Widow's Mite July 

The Arrival of the Mormon Missionaries August 

St. John on Patmos September 

Christ at Emmaus October 

Dawn of Christianity in Hawaii —November 

Doubtful Thomas December 

Cheaters Never Win, W. Cleon Skousen 218 

Children, Individual Differences in; Eldon J. Gardner... 476 
Children: Joys of Having a Baby in the Home, The; 

Hazel West Lewis 360 

Children: Let Your Friendship with Children Show, 

Ruth Washburn 142 



Page 

Children: Watch Over Them with Tenderness; 

Phyllis D. Shaw 252 

Childs, Margaret P.; Ross Becomes a Deacon 212 

Chosen Servant: Mormon, A; Marie F. Felt 

(Picture story) 149 

Chosen Vessel unto Me, LeGrand Richards 466 

Christ at Emmaus, F. Donald Isbell.. ..Center spread, October 
Christ Healing the Blind Men of Jericho, 

F. Donald Isbell Center spread, June 

Christ Is in Their Hearts, Blaine D. Porter 406 

Christ Is the True Light of Men's Lives, 

David O. McKay 461 

Christ Taken Captive, 

F. Donald Isbell ...Center spread, March 

Christensen, Alberta Huish; Benevolence of the Church..404 

Christensen, Joe J.; Why Paul's Ageless Influence? 174 

Christmas: Christ Is in Their Hearts, Blaine D. Porter.. .406 

Christmas: Faded, Blue Blanket, The; Fred Bauer 397 

Christmas: Mysterious Visitor, The; Samuel D. Bogan... .414 

Christmas, This Was Our Happiest; Marie F. Felt 395 

Christmas Worship Service, Earl J. Glade 449 

Church Government Yesterday and Today, 

Richard W. Maycock 208 

Clark, J. Reuben; "I Am the Resurrection and the Life"..334 

Clark, Mary Deane; Order Is a Shining Light 58 

Classroom Music, Addie J. Gilmore 69 

Cline, Victor B.; Obedience and Love 220 

Columbus, The Riddle of 375 

"Come, Come, Ye Saints" (Junior Sunday School 

Hymn), Florence S. Allen 195 

Comfort, Convenience, and Spirituality; Mima Rasband..278 
Coming Events ; 28, 71, 113, 153, 190 

- 231, 273, 313, 355, 399, 438, 489 

Commandments of Men, M. Lee Miller 168 

Commit Thy Way unto Him, Burl Shephard 384 

Communications: World Is One Neighborhood, The; 

Arch L. Madsen 26 

Contributions to a Knowledge of God, Robert C. Patch.... 92 
Converts: To Inherit the Kingdom of God, 

Michael J. Novakovich 281 

Converts: Why I Became a Mormon, Aviva Levine 125 

Correlating Enlistment Work (Superintendents) 

Lynn S. Richards 152 

Counsel: Am I Giving Wise Counsel to My Children? 

Reed H. Bradford 182 

Courage: Be of Good Courage and He Shall 

Strengthen Your Heart, David O. McKay 45 

Courage: Young People Have Courage, Too; 

Marshall T. Burton 308 

Course 1: Meeting the Needs of Children, 

Barbara Poison and Vivian Bagley 144 

Cover Articles 

Fun for the Family, Kenneth S. Bennion .37 

I See Growing Things, Kenneth S. Bennion 57 

Where Hibiscus Bloom, Kenneth S. Bennion 113 

When Shall We Teach? Kenneth S. Bennion 153 

We're Helping Mother, Richard E. Scholle 191 

Serve the Widow: Serve the Lord, 

Richard E. Scholle 231 

Peace Through Play, Richard E. Scholle 270 

Where Is Opportunity? Burl Shephard 297 

We Make Records, Burl Shephard 347 

A Gift for Grandfather, Richard E. Scholle 399 

Expressing Our Thanks, Richard E. Scholle 441 

Acclaimed, Humble Birth, Richard E. Scholle 484 

Cowan, Richard O; Tame and Wild Olive Tree, The ....415 

Cowan, Richard O.; Fall and the Atonement, The 128 

Cowan, Richard O.; In the Mouth of Two or 

Three Witnesses 328 

Cowan, Richard O; Organize for Missionary Work 6 

Cowan, Richard O.; Making History Come Alive 508 

Creation and Procreation, Truman G. Madsen 236 

Culmsee, Carlton; Old Juniper (P) 280 

Culmsee, Carlton; Lights of Christmas (P) 463 

Cultural and Religious Differences, Richard E. Scholle.. 444 
Cut the Profits from Digging Gold Out of Dirt, 

Rex A. Skidmore 118 



Death: When a Loved One Passes Away? 

Reed H. Bradford 146 

Deseret Sunday School General Board 29, 70, 113 

152, 191, 230, 273, 313, 355, 398, 443, 491 



DECEMBER 1964 



499 



Page 

Despain, Goldie Brown; A Leader Is True to 

His Calling 426 

Developing Self-Control, Mark K. Allen 340 

Diamond and Its Imitation, Reed H. Bradford 436 

Dickson, Delmar H.; When Is a Man Big Enough? 383 

Discovery of Priceless Treasure, Vermont Harward 428 

Dixon, Henry Aldous; Faith, Diligence, and Work 478 

Doctor Writes to His Daughter, A; Madison H. Thomas..388 
Doubtful Thomas, F. Donald Isbell 

Center spread, December 

Doughnut and the Hole, The; George R. Hill 91 

Driving: Three C's of Safety, Paul Eugene Griffin 210 

E 

Easter Is a Special Day, Hazel F. Young 4 

Easter programs: Glorious Resurrection, The; 

Earl J. Glade 14 

Eberhard, Ernest, Jr.; Gospel as a Guide to Happiness.... 246 
Egg, What Kind of? 

Wendell J. Ashton Back cover, May 

Elder, Talk to God for Me, Marion D. Hanks 474 

Eliezer and Rebekah, 

F. Donald Isbell Center spread, February 

Ellsworth, S. George; Europe's Legacy for the 

Latter-day Saints 260 

Emotions: A Doctor Writes to His Daughter, 

Madison H. Thomas 388 

Enlistment Work: Correlating Enlistment Work, 

Lynn S. Richards - 152 

Essig, Lester and Joan; Free Agency and Progress 342 

Eternal progression: 

Progress Unlimited, Sterling W. Sill 424 

Europe's Legacy for the Latter-day Saints, 

S. George Ellsworth 260 

Evans, David W.; Adventures of the Spirit: 

Joseph Fielding Smith Center spread, April 

Evans, Richard L.; Fruits of the Gospel 470 

Evil and Suffering, Truman G. Madsen .450 

Exalt the Standard of Democracy, Bruce R. McConkie.344 



Facts and Feelings, Leland H. Monson 422 

Faded, Blue Blanket, The; Fred Bauer 397 

Faith, Diligence, and Work; Henry Aldous Dixon 478 

Faith: Discovery of Priceless Treasure, 

Vermont Harward 428 

Faith: Elder, Talk to God for Me; Marion D. Hanks.... 474 

Faith: Fruits of Faith, The; Willis S. Peterson 151 

Faith-promoting: Follow the Promptings of the Spirit, 

A. William Lund 32 

Fall and the Atonement, The; Richard O. Cowan 128 

Family of Abraham, Burl Shephard 

Inside back cover, January 

Families Help To Build Places of Worship, 

Claribel W. Aldous 86 

Family Councils Bring Family Unity, Henry L. Isaksen.214 

Family Follows the Path of Paul, A; Phyllis S. Allen _ .376 

Family life: Obedience and Love, Victor B. Cline 220 

Family life: Respect the Rights of Others, 

Caroline Kimball Berrett 292 

Family living: Easter Is a Special Day, 

Hazel F. Young .'..,., 4 

Family living: Home and the Church, The; 

David O. McKay 89 

Family living: Order Is a Shining Light, 

Mary Dean Clark 58 

Family's Plan for Celestial Happiness, A; 

J Ballard Washburn 390 

Fasting: Rewards of Fasting Can Be Yours, 

A. Hamer Reiser 44 

Fellowship: Cultural and Religious Differences, 

Richard E. Scholle 444 

Felt, Marie F.; Chosen Servant: Mormon 

(Picture story) ....149 

Felt, Marie F.; Flannelboard stories 

Isaac, a Man of Peace 23 

Abraham, Beloved of God 67 

God Blesses Joseph in Egypt 109 

Their Faith Never Wavered 187 

Prayer Is a Mark of Greatness 227 

On a Morning in May 269 

King David and the Little Lame Prince 309 

This Was Our Happiest Christmas 395 

Lehi and His Family Obey God 439 



Page 

Felt, Marie F.; Great Words To Live By (Picture story) 485 

Felt, Marie F.; How Our Bible Grew 351 

Fleetness and Responsibility of Youth, The; 

David O. McKay . 289 

Follow the Promptings of the Spirit, A. William Lund.... 32 
For Authorized Personnel Only, Theodore M. Burton.. ..180 

"For the Beauty of the Earth," Florence S. Allen 31 

Founding of an American Republic, David O. McKay ....249 

Fox, Ruth May; Of Such Is the Kingdom (P) 335 

Free Agency and Progress, Lester and Joan Essig 342 

Free Agency: We Have the Right To Choose; 

J. Elliot Cameron 131 

Fruits of Faith, The; Willis S. Peterson 151 

Fruits of the Gospel, Richard L. Evans 470 

Fudge, George H.; Microfilming in Europe 87 

Fun for the Family, Kenneth S. Bennion 37 

G 

Gardner, Eldon J.; Individual Differences in Children.... 476 

Gathering Note, The; Alexander Schreiner 194 

Gay, Romney; Peter's Adventure (P) Ill 

Genealogy: An Urgent Latter-day Mission, 

Archibald F. Bennett 496 

Genealogy: Catalog: Key to the Library, 

Delbert E. Roach 248 

Genealogy: How I Found My Tennessee Ancestors, 

Eleanor M. Hall 102 

Genealogy: Neophyte Faces Genealogy, A; 

Richard E. Scholle 264 

Genealogy: Orderly Preservation of Research Notes, 

Norman E. Wright 412 

Genealogy: Patience Is a Requirement, Irene Thorell ....172 

Genealogy: Pick a Starting Task, M. Ralph Shaffer 304 

Genealogy: Romance from an Old Account Book, 

Frances Baker 20 

Genealogy: Teamwork for Success, Bruce W. Wilkin.. ..468 
Genealogy: Using Imagination in Research, 

Jimmy B. Parker 346 

Genealogy, Why? Theodore M. Burton 434 

Genealogy: Why Genealogical Work? 

T. Bowring Woodbury 318 

Gentile Christianity and the Fellowship of God, 

A. Burt Horsley 240 

Gift for Grandfather, A; Richard E. Scholle 399 

Gilmore, Addie J.; Classroom Music 69 

Glade, Earl J.; Glorious Resurrection, The 14 

Glade, Earl J.; Great Example, A 70 

Glade, Earl J.; Keep Them Coming 70 

Glade, Earl J.; Note for Superintendents, A 71 

Glorious Resurrection, The; Earl J. Glade 14 

Glow and Grow, 

Wendell J. Ashton Outside back cover, June 

Goals of Gospel Teaching, Lynn S. Richards 311 

God and man: At One with God, Anthony I. Bentley.... 50 

God Blesses Joseph in Egypt, Marie F. Felt 109 

God: Creation and Procreation, Truman G. Madsen 236 

Goeckeritz, Gerhardt; My Seven Clouds 54 

Gold from Ancient America 438 

Gospel as a Guide to Happiness, The; 

Ernest Eberhard, Jr 246 

Gospel living: Keeping Ourselves "Unspotted from 

the World," David O. McKay 329 

Gospel living: My Seven Clouds, Gerhardt Goeckeritz .... 54 

Gospel living: True End of Life, David O. McKay 1 

Gospel living: When Is a Man Big Enough? 

Delmar H. Dickson 383 

Great Example, A; Earl J. Glade 70 

Great Words To Live By, Marie F. Felt 485 

Great Teacher Effectiveness, George R. Hill 171 

Greatest Possession, David O. McKay 129 

Griffin, Paul Eugene; Three C's of Safety 210 

Grover, Roscoe A.; Ruth, the Girl from Moab 254 

Growth of the Church in Atlanta, William L. Nicholls ....200 

H 

Habit of Perfect Attendance at Sunday School, 

George R. Hill 419 

Habit of Sunday School Attendance, George R. Hill 300 

Hall, Eleanor M.; How I Found My Tennessee 

Ancestors 102 

Halley's Comet, Alexander Schreiner 446 

Handbook Changes, David Lawrence McKay 398 

Hanks, Marion D.; Elder, Talk to God for Me 474 

Happiest Mother's Day, The; Evalyn Darger Bennett .... 94 



500 



THE INSTRUCTOR 



Page 

Happiness, The Gospel as a Guide to; Ernest 

Eberhard, Jr . 246 

Happy Anniversary: Superintendent and Sister Hill, 

David Lawrence McKay Center spread, May 

Harmon, Paul L.; Two Great Men 456 

Harmony Between Science and Religion, 

James C. Wheelwright 8 

Harris, Franklin S., Jr.; What Is Revelation? 336 

Harris, Martin: Passing of; William H. Homer 266 

Harry, Sue Shizuko; University Stake Graduates 76 ...442 

Harward, Vermont; Discovery of Priceless Treasure 428 

Hawaii: Arrival of the Mormon Missionaries, 

Center spread, August 

Hawaii, Dawn of Christianity in.. ..Center spread, November 
Healing: Prayer: Doorway to Heaven, 

Herald L. Carlston 184 

He Was a Hero Where He Lost, 

Wendell J. Ashton Outside back cover, October 

Hill, Chester W.; Private Music Teacher and the 

Ward Music Program, The 338 

Hill, George R. Hill (Editorials) 

The Instructor — A Necessary Help 37 

The Importance of Preparation Meeting 76 

The Doughnut and the Hole 91 

Responsibility of Teachers 148 

Greater Teacher Effectiveness 171 

Advantages of Regular Sunday School Attendance.... 233 

Appreciation of Sunday School Manuals 271 

Habit of Sunday School Attendance ..300 

Sharpened Tool for Effective Teaching 350 

How Can Superintendency Help Teachers? 394 

Habit of Perfect Attendance 419 

Spirit of Christmas 484 

Hill, George R.; Happy Anniversary; 

David Lawrence McKay Center spread, May 

History: Making, Come Alive; Richard O. Cowan 508 

Hobbs, Charles R.; Tell Me About the Holy Ghost 12 

Holy Ghost: Tell Me About the; Charles R. Hobbs .... 12 

Holy Ghost: Unspeakable Gift, Rodney Turner 140 

Home and the Church, David O. McKay 89 

Homer, William H.; Passing of Martin Harris 266 

Honesty: Cheaters Never Win, W. Cleon Skousen 218 

Hoopes, Paul R.; Vision of Old Testament Prophets 43 

Horsley, A. Burt; Gentile Christianity and the 

Fellowship of God 240 

Houston, D. Crawford; Sermon on the Mount — A 

Guide to Living and Working with Others ....114 

How Can the Suoerintendency Help Sunday School 

Teachers, George R. Hill 394 

How Do I Teach My Child To Accept Responsibility? 

Reed H. Bradford 18 

How Do I Teach This Lesson? Paul Vorkink 154 

How Isaiah Warned His People . . . and Us, 

Ellis T. Rasmussen 64 

How Long Shall I Honor My Mother and Father? 

Kenneth S. Bennion 458 

"How Lovely Are the Messengers," Florence S. Allen.. ..116 

How Our Bible Grew, Marie F. Felt 351 

How Shall I Forgive Another? Reed H. Bradford 62 

How To Avoid Offending Class Members, 

Kenneth S. Bennion 274 

How To Be a Friend, Lorin F. Wheelwright .192 

How To Be Tolerant of Others, Henry Eyring 296 

How To Encourage Attendance at Sunday School, 

Mima Rasband 353 

How To "Keep a Welcome" in Sunday School C-5 

How To Meet a Newcomer, J. Elliot Cameron 232 

How To Orient a Convert, Fred W. Schwendiman 400 

How To Orient Investigators, Henry L. Isaksen 356 

Howells, Rulon S.; So, You're Going To Be a 

Missionary! 34 

How I Found My Tennessee Ancestors, 

Eleanor M. Hall , 102 

How The Instructor Helps Me Prepare, 

Mark W. Cannon 25 

Human relations: Sermon on the Mount — A Guide to 
Living and Working with Others, 

D. Crawford Houston 114 

Humility: Quest for Humility, Wendell J. Ashton 52 

Hymn of the Month; Junior Sunday School 

"For the Beauty of the Earth" 31 

"We Give Thee But Thine Own" 75 

"How Lovely Are the Messengers" 116 

"Oh, How Lovely Was the Morning" 156 



Page 

"Come, Come, Ye Saints" 195 

"Jesus, the Very Thought of Thee" 235 

"While of These Emblems We Partake" 277 

"We Thank Thee, O God, for a Prophet" .317 

"Father, Thou Who Carest" 359 

"Far, Far Away on Judea's Plains" „ 40S 

"I Think When I Read That Sweet Story" 447 

"An Evening Song" 493 

Hymn of the Month, Senior Sunday School; 
Alexander Schreiner 

"O God, the Eternal Father" 30 

"O My Father" 74 

"Rejoice, The Lord Is King" 116 

"Sing Paise to Him" 156 

"Oh Beautiful for Spacious Skies" 194 

"In Memory of the Crucified" 234 

"To Nephi, Seer of Olden Time" 276 

"Oh What Songs of the Heart" 316 

"Come, Ye Thankful People" 358 

"Hark! The Herald Angels Sing" 402 

"Prayer Is the Soul's Sincere Desire" 446 

"Welcome, Welcome, Sabbath Morning" 492 

Hymns We Love To Sing 316 



"I Am the Resurrection and the Life," 

J. Reuben Clark, Jr 334 

Identity or Nothing, Truman G. Madsen 96 

I See Growing Things, Kenneth S. Bennion 57 

Importance of Preparation Meeting, George R. Hill 76 

"In Memory of the Crucified," Senior Sunday 

School Hymn; Alexander Schreiner 234 

In Quest of Trained Sunday School Teachers, 

George R. Hill 354 

In Support of the Priesthood, Lynn S. Richards 190 

In the Footsteps of Leaders 

A Leader Is True to His Calling, 
Goldie Brown Despain 

A Leader Is Courageous 426 

A Leader Is Humble 

A Leader Is Unselfish, Lowell R. Jackson 427 

In the Mouth of Two or Three Witnesses, 

Richard O. Cowan 328 

In the Spirit of the Master, Ernest L. Wilkinson 88 

Indian . . . My Neighbor, Dean L. Larsen 176 

Individual Differences in Children, Eldon J. Gardner.. ..476 
Industrial School: Candidates for Celestial Glory, 

Burl Shephard . 482 

Insights into "We'll Keep a Welcome," 

Anthony I. Bentley 372 

Inspirational Talk, Claribel W. Aldous 189 

Inspired Teaching — A Teacher's Goal, Sterling Provost... 490 
Instructor: How The Instructor Helps Me Prepare, 

Mark W. Cannon 25 

Instructor: Sharpened Tool for Effective Teaching, 

George R. Hill 350 

Instructor Staff 2, 47, 93, 130 

171, 207, 253, 291, 331, 375, 419, 465 

Instructor, The — A Necessary Help; George R. Hill 37 

Inventory for Stake Board Members and 

Administrators C-ll 

Investigators, How To Orient; Henry L. Isaksen 356 

Is Record Keeping Important? Dale H. West 178 

Isaac, a Man of Peace, Marie F. Felt 23 

Isaiah: How Isaiah Warned His People . . .and Us, 

Ellis T. Rasmussen 64 

Isaksen, Henry L.; Family Councils Bring Family Unity.. 214 

Isaksen, Henry L.; How To Orient Investigators 356 

Israel: Tame and Wild Olive Tree, The; 

Richard O. Cowan 415 

Isbell, F. Donald; Center spread articles 

Eliezer and Rebekah February 

Christ Taken Captive March 

Christ Healing the Blind Men of Jericho June 

Widow's Mite July 

St. John on Patmos September 

Christ at Emmaus October 

The Doubtful Thomas December 



Jackson, Lowell R.; 

A Leader Is Courageous 426 

A Leader Is Humble 

A Leader Is Unselfish 427 



DECEMBER 1964 



501 



Page 

Jackson, Lowell L.; Thou Shalt Not Kill 179 

Jensen, Mary W.; Junior Sunday School Hymn of Month 

"Jesus, the Very Thought of Thee" 235 

"We Thank Thee, O God, for a Prophet" 317 

"Father, Thou Who Carest" ,.. 359 

"Far, Far Away on Judea's Plains" 403 

"I Think When I Read That Sweet Story" 447 

"An Evening Song" 493 

Jesus the Christ, Lowell L. Bennion 38, 80, 120 

164, 196, 242, 285, 322, 368, 408 

"Jesus, the Very Thought of Thee," Mary W. Jensen....235 

"Jesus, Once of Humble Birth" ._ .448 

Jewish history: When Rome Conquered Judea, 

Burl Shephard :. 10 

Jews: Those Who Rebelled, H. George Bickerstaff 432 

John Milton and Mormon Doctrine, Jack H. Adamson.... 16 

Jordan, Herbert E.; Power Through Welfare 101 

Joseph Smith and Peter: Men of Action, 

A. Hamer Reiser 162 

Joys of Having a Baby in the Home, Hazel West Lewis..360 

Judaism: Pharisees, Louis C. Zucker 224 

Judaism: Why I Became a Mormon, Aviva Levine 125 

Junior Sunday School articles 

The Inspirational Talk, Claribel W. Aldous ;..... 189 

Comfort, Convenience, and Spirituality, 

Mima Rasband 278 

How To Encourage Attendance at Sunday School, 

Mima Rasband 353 

Their Talks Are Your Assignment, Too; 

Lorna C. Alder .441 

Bind Your Pictures, Lorna C. Alder 487 

Junior Sunday School: Meeting Needs of Course 1 

Children, Barbara Poison and Vivian Bagley 144 



K 



70 



Keep Them Coming, Earl J. Glade 

Keeping Ourselves "Unspotted from the World," 

David O. McKay 329 

Kill, Thou Shalt Not; Lowell L. Jackson 179 

Kimball, Rodney, family: Respect the Rights of 

Others, Caroline Kimball Berrett 292 

King David and the Little Lame Prince, Marie F. Felt..309 

Kirkham, Francis W.; Why the Book of Mormon? 472 

Kitto, Margaret Ipson; Mary Jo's First Prayer 186 



Language of Prayer, Oliver R. Smith 56 

Larsen, Dean L.; Indian . . . My Neighbor 176 

Latter-day Prophets Discuss the Resurrection 335 

Law of the Land, William P. Miller 321 

Leadership: Doughnut and the Hole, George R. Hill .... 91 
Leadership for the Lord's Purposes, William E. Berrett..380 
Leadership: In the Footsteps of Leaders 

A Leader Is True to His Calling, 
Goldie Brown Despain 

A Leader Is Courageous 426 

A Leader Is Humble 

A Leader Is Unselfish, Lowell R. Jackson 427 

Leadership: What Characteristics Make a Religious 

Leader? Neal A. Maxwell 48 

Leadership: When Is a Man Big Enough? 

Delmar H. Dickson 383 

Learning: Summit of Life, Wendell J. Ashton 

Outside back cover, January 

LeFevre, Don; Tall Missionary, A 134 

Lehi and His Family Obey God (Flannelboard story), 

Marie F. Felt 438 

Lessons for Stake Conference Sunday 

Language of Prayer, The; Oliver R. Smith 56 

Is Record Keeping Important? Dale H. West 178 

Law of the Land, The; William P. Miller 321 

Facts and Feelings, Leland H. Monson 422 

Lessons That Lead To Improved Behavior, 

Asahel D. Woodruff 72 

Let Us Reason Together, Wendell J. Ashton 

Outside back cover, August 

Let Your Friendship with Children Show, 

Ruth W. Washburn 142 

Letter To My Mother, A; Joyce Sainsbury Birch 175 

Levai, Blaise; Most Famous Book in the World .314 

Levine, Aviva; Why I Became a Mormon 125 

Lewis, Hazel West; Joys of Having a Baby in the Home. .360 



Page 

Lights of Christmas (P), Carlton Culmsee 463 

Lord's Prayer Center spread, September 

Lund, A. William; Follow the Promptings of the Spirit.... 32 

M 

McConkie, Bruce R.; Exalt the Standard of Democracy.. 344 

McKay, David Lawrence; 1964 Handbook Changes 398 

McKay, David O. — Editorials 

True End of Life 1 

Be of Good Courage and He Shall Strengthen 

Your Heart 45 

Home and the Church, The 89 

Greatest Possession, The 129 

Motherhood 169 

Man's Greatest Trust 205 

Founding of an American Republic 249 

Fleetness and Responsibility of Youth, The 289 

Keeping Ourselves "Unspotted from the World"....329 

Radiation of the Individual 373 

Temples Are Erected for the Blessing of the People.417 

Christ Is the True Light of Men's Lives 461 

Maccabean Family: When Rome Conquered Judea, 

Burl Shephard 10 

Madsen, Arch L.; The World Is One Neighborhood 26 

Madsen, Truman G.; Problems facing man series 

Identity or Nothing 97 

Creation and Procreation 236 

Mind and the Body, The 362 

Evil and Suffering 450 

Making History Come Alive, Richard O. Cowan 508 

Man and God: At One with God, Anthony I. Bentley. ... 50 

Man's Greatest Trust, David O. McKay 205 

Manuals: Appreciation of Our Sunday School 

Manuals, George R. Hill 271 

Marriage: Temples Are Erected for the Blessing of the 

People, David O. McKay 417 

Mary Jo's First Prayer, Margaret Ipson Kitto 186 

Maxwell, Neal A.; Understanding Students' 

Individual Differences 494 

Maxwell, Neal A.; What Characteristics Make a 

Religious Leader? 48 

Maycock, Howard C; Will You Be a Missionary? .464 

Maycock, Richard W.; Church Government Yesterday 

and Today 208 

Meeting Needs of Course 1 Children, 

Barbara Poison and Vivian Bagley 144 

Memorized Recitations 29, 71, 113, 153 

- 191, 231, 273, 313, 355, 399, 443, 489 

Men of Action, A. Hamer Reiser 152 

Microfilming in Europe, George H. Fudge 87 

Miller, M. Lee; Commandments of Men 168 

Miller, William P.; Law of the Land 321 

Milton: John Milton and Mormon Doctrine, 

Jack H. Adamson 16 

Mind and the Body, Truman G. Madsen 362 

Miracles: What Are? Thomas J. Parmley 136 

Missionary: Will You Be a? Howard C. Maycock 464 

Missionary work: So, You're Going To Be a 

Missionary! Rulon S. Howells 34 

Missions: Organize for Missionary Work, 

Richard O. Cowan 6 

Monson, Leland H.; Facts and Feelings 422 

Mormon: A Chosen Servant; Marie F. Felt 149 

Mormonism: Religion Can Be a Daring Adventure, 

Mildred Shoaff 430 

Most Famous Book in the World, Blaise Levai 314 

Motherhood, David O. McKay 169 

Mother Is Always There, Lorin F. Wheelwright 66 

Mothers: Letter To My Mother, A; 

Joyce Sainsbury Birch 175 

Mother's Day: Happiest Mother's Day, 

Evalyn Darger Bennett 94 

Mother's Day Programs: Remember Thy Mother! 78 

Music and Life, Alexander Schreiner 113 

Music: Classroom Music, Addie J. Gilmore 69 

Music Lessons ... At What Age? Alexander Schreiner.. 77 
Music teaching: Private Music Teacher and Ward 

Music Program, The; Chester W. Hill 338 

Musical feature: But the Spirit Giveth Light, 

Ronald D. Pexton _ 492 

My Mission, Reed H. Bradford 222 

My Seven Clouds, Gerhardt Goeckeritz 54 

Mysterious Visitor, The, Samuel D. Bogan 414 



502 



THE INSTRUCTOR 



Page 

N 

Neophyte Faces Genealogy, Richard E. Scholle 264 

Newcomer, How to Meet; J. Elliot Cameron 232 

New York World's Fair: A Tall Missionary, 

Don LeFeyre 134 

Nicholls, William L.; Growth of the Church in Atlanta..200 

Note for Superintendents, Earl J. Glade 71 

Novakovich, Michael J.; To Inherit the Kingdom of God.. 281 



"O, God, the Eternal Father," Alexander Schreiner 30 

"O My Father," Alexander Schreiner 74 

Oakes, Keith R; Which Is Your Type of Teaching? 288 

Obedience and Love, Victor B. Cline 220 

Of Such Is the Kingdom (P), Ruth May Fox .335 

"Oh Beautiful for Spacious Skies," Alexander Schreiner.. 194 
"Oh, How Lovely Was the Morning," Florence S. Allen.. 156 

Old Juniper (P), Carlton Culmsee 280 

Old Testament: Vision of Old Testament Prophets, 

Paul R. Hoopes 43 

On a Morning in May; Marie F. Felt 269 

Order Is a Shining Light, Mary Deane Clark 58 

Orderly Preservation of Research Notes, 

Norman E. Wright 412 

Organize for Missionary Work, Richard O. Cowan 6 

Our Hymns of Thanksgiving 358 

P 

Packer, Boyd K.; Teaching Is an Art 332 

Parenthood: Man's Greatest Trust, David O. McKay ...205 
Parents: How Long Shall I Honor My Mother and 

Father? Kenneth S. Bennion 458 

Parker, Jimmy B.; Using Imagination in Research 346 

Parmley, Thomas J.; What Are Miracles? 136 

Passing of Martin Harris, William H. Homer 266 

Patch, Robert C; Contributions to a Knowledge of God.. 92 

Patience Is a Requirement, Irene Thorell 172 

Patriarchal blessings: Chosen Vessel unto Me, 

LeGrand Richards .....466 

Paul: A Family Follows the Path of; Phyllis S. Allen .376 
Paul: Why Paul's Ageless Influence? Joe J. Christensen .174 
Peace Through Play (Our Cover), Richard E. Scholle. .270 

Pearson, Glenn L.; Triumph of Salvation, The 60 

Penrod, Dean and Elizabeth; 

To Talk with God Face to Face 366 

Personal Inventory for Teachers C-ll 

Peter and Joseph Smith: Men of Action, 

A. Hamer Reiser 162 

Peter's Adventure (P), Romney Gay Ill 

Peterson, Willis S.; Fruits of Faith 151 

Pexton, Ronald D.; But the Spirit Giveth Light 492 

Pharisees, Louis C. Zucker 224 

Photo and Art Credits 

15, 74, 124, 153, 188, 231, 276, 317, 367, 411 

Pick a Starting Task, M. Ralph Shaffer 304 

Plan of Salvation: Fall and the Atonement, 

Richard O. Cowan 128 

Poetry 

Peter's Adventure, Romney Gay Ill 

What God Hath Promised, Anne Johnson Flint 148 

Sowing, Thackeray 169 

My Mother, David O. McKay 170 

Independence Bell 249 

Welcome, Welcome, Sabbath Morning 256 

Time, Nora Tait Bradford 262 

Old Juniper, Carlton Culmsee 280 

You Are the Fellow, Edgar A. Guest 291 

Fisherman's Prayer 383 

Lights of Christmas, Carlton Culmsee 463 

They on the Heights 482 

If Nobody Smiled, Arthur James Hayden 483 

The Teacher, Leslie Pinckney Hill 490 

Politics: Exalt the Standard of Democracy, 

Bruce R. McConkie 344 

Poison, Barbara and Bagley, Vivian; 

Meeting Needs of Course 1 Children 144 

Porter, Blaine D.; Christ Is in Their Hearts 406 

Power Through Welfare, Herbert E. Jordan 101 

Prayer: Doorway to Revelation; Herald L. Carlston ....184 

Prayer Is a Mark of Greatness, Marie F. Felt 227 

Prayer Is for Guidance, John J. Stewart 204 

Prayer: Language of Prayer, Oliver R. Smith 56 

Prayer, Mary Jo's First; Margaret Ipson Kitto 186 



Page 

Prayer: To Talk with God Face to Face, 

Dean and Elizabeth Penrod 366 

Preparation Meeting: Importance of Preparation 

Meeting, George R. Hill 76 

Preparation Meeting Is Essential, Lynn S. Richards ...442 

Preparedness: Great Example, A; Earl J. Glade 70 

Preparing Children for Sunday School, Glen L. Rudd....229 
Priesthood — Aaronic: On a Morning in May, 

Marie F. Felt 269 

Private Music Teacher and Ward Music Program, 

Chester W. Hill 338 

Privilege of Stake Board Service, George R. Hill 488 

Problems or Challenges, Wendell J. Ashton 

Outside back cover, July 

Programs: Christmas 449 

Progress Unlimited, Sterling W. Sill 424 

Prophets: Vision of Old Testament Prophets, 

Paul R. Hoopes 43 

Provost, Sterling; A Teacher's Goal — Inspired Teaching.. 490 
Public-address systems: Note for Superintendents, 

Earl J. Glade 71 

Purity, Quest for, Jessie R. Ursenbach 159 

Q 

Quest for Humility, Wendell J. Ashton 52 

Quest for Purity, Jessie R. Ursenbach 159 

R 

Radiation of the Individual, David O. McKay 373 

Rasband, Mima; Comfort, Convenience, and Spirituality.. 278 
Rasband, Mima; Why Children Remain in Junior 

Sunday School after Baptism 312 

Rasmussen, Ellis T.; How Isaiah Warned His 

People ... and Us 64 

Rasmussen, Ellis T.; Wherefore Do Ye Tempt the 

Lord? 104 

Record keeping: Is Record Keeping Important? 

Dale H. West 178 

Reformation: Europe's Legacy for the Latter-day 

Saints, S. George Ellsworth 260 

Reiser, A. Hamer; Men of Action 162 

Reiser, A. Hamer; Rewards of Fasting Can Be Yours.... 44 

"Rejoice, the Lord Is King," Alexander Schreiner 116 

Released with Appreciation: Edgar B. Brossard, 

Howard S. Bennion .211 

Religion Can Be a Daring Adventure, Mildred Shoaff....430 
Religion-Science: Harmony Between Science and 

Religion, James C. Wheelwright 8 

Remember Thy Mother! (Mother's Day Programs) 78 

Respect the Rights of Others, Caroline Kimball Berrett.292 
Responsibility: How Do I Teach My Child To Accept 

Responsibility? Reed H. Bradford 18 

Resurrection: "I Am the Resurrection and the Life," 

J. Reuben Clark, Jr 334 

Resurrection, Latter-day Prophets Discuss 335 

Resurrection, S. Dilworth Young 132 

Revelation, What Is? Franklin S. Harris, Jr 336 

Rewards of Fasting Can Be Yours, A. Hamer Reiser... 44 

Richards, LeGrand; Chosen Vessel unto Me 466 

Richards, Lynn S. — Answers To Your Questions 

29, 71, 112, 153, 191, 231, 313, 399, 443, 488 

Riddle of Columbus 375 

Roach, Delbert E.; Catalog: Key to the Library 248 

Romance from an Old Account Book, Frances Baker ... 20 
Romney, Lenore LaFount; We Can Export Brotherhood. .298 

Ross Becomes a Deacon, Margaret P. Childs 212 

Rudd, Glen L.; Preparing Children for Sunday School. 229 

Ruth, the Girl from Moab; Roscoe A. Grover 254 

S 
Sacrament Gems 31, 75, 117, 157 

195, 235, 277, 317, 359, 403, 447, 493 

Safety: Three C's of Safety, Paul Eugene Griffin 210 

Salvation: "And Thus Was the Gospel Preached to the 

Dead," Joseph F. Smith 294 

Salvation: Triumph of Salvation, Glenn L. Pearson 60 

Scholle, Richard E.; cover articles 

We're Helping Mother 191 

Serve the Widow: Serve the Lord 231 

Peace Through Play 270 

A Gift for Grandfather 399 

Expressing Our Thanks 441 

Acclaimed, Humble Birth 484 

Scholle, Richard E.; Cultural and Religious Differences.. 444 
Scholle, Richard E.; A Neophyte Faces Genealogy 264 



DECEMBER 1964 



503 



Page 

Schreiner, Alexander; Music Lessons ... At What Age?.. 77 
Schreiner, Alexander: Music page feature 

Gathering Note, The - 194 

Halley's Comet 446 

Music Lessons ... At What Age? 77 

Music and Life a 112 

Story of the Three Bears 358 

Schreiner, Alexander — Senior Sunday School 
Hymn of the Month 

"O God, the Eternal Father" 30 

"O My Father" 74 

"Rejoice, The Lord Is King" 116 

"Sing Praise to Him" 156 

"Oh Beautiful for Spacious Skies" 194 

"To Nephi, Seer of Olden Time" 276 

"Oh What Songs of the Heart" 316 

"Come, Ye Thankful People" 358 

"Hark! The Herald Angels Sing" 402 

"Prayer Is the Soul's Sincere Desire" 446 

"Welcome, Welcome, Sabbath Morning" 492 

Schwendiman, Fred W.; How To Orient a Convert 400 

Science-Religion: Harmony Between Science and 

Religion, The; James C. Wheelwright 8 

See the Flower in the Seed, Lorin F. Wheelwright 3 

Self-Control, Developing; Mark K. Allen 340 

Sensitive Line, Reed H. Bradford 306 

Sermon on the Mount — A Guide to Living and Working 

with Others, D. Crawford Houston 114 

Shaffer, M. Ralph; Pick a Starting Task 304 

Sharpened Tool for Effective Teaching, George R. Hill.. ..350 
Shaw, Phyllis D.; Watch Over Them with Tenderness... .252 

Shephard, Burl; Candidates for Celestial Glory 482 

Shephard, Burl; "Commit Thy Way unto Him" 384 

Shephard, Burl; Family of Abraham, The; 

Inside back cover, January 

Shephard, Burl; When Rome Conquered Judea 10 

Shephard, Burl; When We Know People, We 

Love Them 318 

Shephard, Burl; Witnesses for Christ (C) 

Inside back cover, August 

Shoaff, Mildred; Religion Can Be a Daring Adventure.. 430 

Sill, Sterling W.; Progress Unlimited 424 

Simpson, Robert L.; The Bishop: A Father to His 

People 282 

"Sing Praise to Him," Alexander Schreiner 156 

Skidmore, Rex A.; Cut the Profits from Digging 

Gold Out of Dirt 118 

Skousen, W. Cleon; Cheaters Never Win 218 

Smith, Joseph: Leadership for the Lord's Purposes, 

William E. Berrett 380 

Smith, Joseph: Two Great Men, Paul L. Harmon 456 

Smith, Joseph Fielding: Adventures of the Spirit, 

David W. Evans Center spread, April 

Smith, Joseph F.; "And Thus Was the Gospel 

Preached to the Dead" 294 

Smith, Oliver R.; Language of Prayer 56 

So, You're Going To Be a Missionary! 

Rulon S. Howells 34 

Soul: Mind and the Body, Truman G. Madsen 362 

Spirit: Follow the Promptings of the Spirit, 

A. William Lund 32 

Spirit of Christmas, George R. Hill 484 

Spiritual courage: Be of Good Courage and He Shall 

Strengthen Your Heart, David O. McKay 45 

Spiritual values: A Time and a Place, 

Reed H. Bradford 348 

Spiritual values: Radiation of the Individual, 

David O. McKay 373 

Spiritual values: We Can Export Brotherhood, 

Lenore Lafount Romney 298 

St. John on Patmos, F. Donald Isbell 

Center spread, September 

Stake missions: Organize for Missionary Work, 

Richard O. Cowan 6 

Standards: My Seven Clouds, Gerhardt Goeckeritz 54 

Stewart, John J.; Prayer Is for Guidance 204 

Story of the Three Bears, Alexander Schreiner 358 

Students: Understanding Individual Differences, 

Neal A. Maxwell 494 

Sum Total, John H. Vandenberg -256 

Summit of Life, Wendell J. Ashton 

Outside back cover, January 

Sunday School, Preparing Children for; Glen L. Rudd.. .229 
Sunday Schools: Sinn Total, John H. Vandenberg 256 



Page 

Superintendents' Articles 

Who Presides in Sunday School Meetings? 28 

Keep Them Coming 70 

Correlating Enlistment Work -152 

In Support of the Priesthood 190 

As with the Priest— So with the People 230 

Digressions ~ 272 

Budget Fund and Its Collection 272 

The Goals of Gospel Teaching 311 

Why Children Remain in Junior Sunday 

School after Baptism 312 

In Quest of Trained Teachers 354 

1964 Handbook Changes 398 

University Stake Graduates 76 442 

Preparation Meeting Is Essential 442 

Privilege of Stake Board Service 488 

T 

Tall Missionary, A; Don LeFevre 134 

Tallest Living Things, Wendell J. Ashton 

Outside back cover, April 

Tame and Wild Olive Tree, Richard O. Cowan 415 

Teacher Improvement Lessons 

How The Instructor Helps Me Prepare My Sunday 

School Lessons, Mark W. Cannon . 25 

Lessons That Lead To Improved Behavior 

Asahel D. Woodruff 72 

Sermon on the Mount, The — A Guide, 

D. Crawford Houston 114 

How Do I Teach This Lesson? Paul Vorkink 154 

How To Be A Friend, Lorin F. Wheelwright 192 

How To Meet a Newcomer, J. Elliot Cameron 232 

How To Avoid Offending Class Members, 

Kenneth S. Bennion 274 

How To Be Tolerant of Others, Henry Eyring 296 

How To Orient Investigators, Henry L. Isaksen 356 

How To Orient a Convert, Fred W. Schwendiman.... 400 

Cultural and Religious Differences, 

Richard E. Scholle 444 

Understanding Students' Differences, 

Neal A. Maxwell 494 

Teacher training: University Stake Graduates 76, 

Sue Shizuko Harry 442 

Teacher's Goal — Inspired Teaching! A, 

Sterling R. Provost 490 

Teachers and teaching: Facts and Feelings, 

Leland H. Monson 422 

Teachei+s: In Quest of Trained Teachers, George R. Hill..354 
Teachers: See the Flower in the Seed, 

Lorin F. Wheelwright 3 

Teaching: Comfort, Convenience, and Spirituality; 

Mima Rasband 278 

Teaching: Fruits of the Gospel, Richard L. Evans 470 

Teaching Is an Art, Boyd K. Packer 332 

Teaching, Which is Your Type of? Keith R. Oakes 288 

TeamWork for Success, Bruce W. Wilkin 468 

Tell Me About the Holy Ghost, Charles R. Hobbs 12 

Temples Are Erected for the Blessing of the People, 

David O. McKay 417 

Temples for Christlike Service, Benjamin L. Bowring....216 
Ten Commandments: Great Words To Live by, 

Marie F. Felt 485 

Testimony: Greatest Possession, David O. McKay 129 

Thanks to Thee (S), Lorin F. Wheelwright 353 

Their Faith Never Wavered, Marie F. Felt 187 

Their Hands Are Clasped as Lovers, Nelson Wadsworth..420 
Their Talks Are Your Assignment, Too; Lorna C. Alder. .441 

This Hour and This Day, Reed H. Bradford 262 

This Was Our Happiest Christmas, Marie F. Felt 395 

Thomas, Madison H; A Doctor Writes to His Daughter.. 388 

Thorell, Irene; Patience Is a Requirement 172 

Those Who Rebelled, H. George Bickerstaff 432 

Thou Shalt Not Kill, Lowell L. Jackson 179 

Three C's of Safety, Paul Eugene Griffin 210 

Timing, Wendell J. Ashton ....Outside back cover, December 
Titles and Dates of Sunday School Lessons (C) 84, 203, 326 

First Quarter, 1965 454 

To Inherit the Kingdom of God, Michael J. Novakovich..281 
To Pray in Gladness: Hymns for the month, 

Alexander Schreiner and Mary W. Jensen 446 

To Talk with God Face to Face, Dean and Elizabeth 

Penrod 366 

Tolerance: How To Be Tolerant of Others, 

Henry Eyring 296 



504 



THE INSTRUCTOR 



Page 

Triumph of Salvation, Glenn L. Pearson 60 

True End of Life; David O. McKay 1 

Truth: Contributions to a Knowledge of God, 

Robert C. Patch . 92 

Turner, Rodney; Unspeakable Gift 140 

Two Great Men, Paul L. Harmon 456 

Types of Teaching (C) , Keith R. Oakes 

.Inside back cover, July 

U 

Understanding Students' Individual Differences, 

Neal A. Maxwell 494 

University Stake Graduates 76, Sue Shizuko Harry 442 

Unspeakable Gift, Rodney Turner .:. - 140 

"Unspotted from the World," Keeping Ourselves; 

David O. McKay 329 

Urgent Latter-day Mission, An; Archibald F. Bennett.. ..496 

Ursenbach, Jessie R.; Quest for Purity 159 

Using Imagination in Research, Jimmy B. Parker 346 

V 

Vandenberg, John H.; Sum Total 256 

Vision of Old Testament Prophets, Paul R. Hoopes 43 

Vorkink, Paul; How Do I Teach This Lesson? 154 

W 

Wadsworth, Nelson; Their Hands Are Clasped as 

Lovers 420 

Washburn, Ruth W.; Let Your Friendship with 

Children Show 142 

Washburn, J Ballard; A Family's Plan for 

Celestial Happiness 390 

Watch Over Them with Tenderness; Phyllis D. Shaw. .252 
We Can Export Brotherhood, Lenore Lafount Romney....298 

"We Give Thee But Thine Own," Florence S. Allen 75 

We Have the Right To Choose, J. Elliot Cameron 131 

We Make Records (Our Cover), Burl Shephard 347 

"Welcome, Welcome, Sabbath Morning" 492 

Welfare: Benevolence of the Church, 

Alberta Huish Christensen 404 

Welfare: Power Through Welfare, Herbert E. Jordan ....101 

We'll Extend a Warm Welcome C-6 

We'll Keep a Welcome 

How To Be a Friend, Lorin F. Wheelwright 192 

How To Meet a Newcomer, J. Elliot Cameron 232 

How To Avoid Offending Class Members, 

Kenneth S. Bennion : 274 

How To Be Tolerant of Others, Henry Eyring 296 

How To Orient Investigators, Henry L. Isaksen ....356 

Insights into "We'll Keep a Welcome," 

Anthony I. Bentley 372 

How To Orient a Convert, Fred W. Schwendiman....400 

Cultural and Religious Differences, 

Richard E. Scholle 444 

Understanding Students' Differences, 

Neal A. Maxwell 494 

"We'll Keep a Welcome . . ." C-3, C-10 

"We'll Keep a Welcome," Insights into; 

Anthony I. Bentley 372 

We'll Make Worship a Welcome C-7 

We'll Teach with a Welcome - C-8 

We're Helping Mother (Our Cover), Richard E. Scholle.191 

Wesley, John: Two Great Men, Paul L. Harmon 456 

West, Dale H.; Is Record Keeping Important? 178 

What a Joyful Sound! 492 

What Are Miracles? Thomas J. Parmley 136 

What Characteristics Make a Religious Leader? 

Neal A. Maxwell 48 

What Do I Do If My Child Seems Indifferent to the 

Gospel? Reed H. Bradford __ 106 

What Is Revelation? Franklin S. Harris, Jr 336 

What "Keep a Welcome" Means C-5 

What Kind of Egg? Wendell J. Ashton 

Outside back cover, May 

Wheelwright, James C; Harmony Between Science 

and Religion , 8 

Wheelwright, Lorin F.; How To Be a Friend 192 

Wheelwright, Lorin F. 

See the Flower in the Seed 3 

Mother Is Always There 66 

Wheelwright, Lorin F.; Thanks to Thee (S) 353 

When a Loved One Passes Away, Reed H. Bradford 146 

When a Man Is Called of God, Joseph Anderson 302 



Page 

When Is a Man Big Enough? Delmar H. Dickson .383 

When We Know People, We Love Them; 

Burl Shephard 318 

When Rome Conquered Judea, Burl Shephard 10 

When Shall We Teach? (Our Cover), 

Kenneth S. Bennion 153 

Where Is My Treasure? Reed H. Bradford 392 

Where Is Opportunity? (Our Cover), Burl Shephard. ...297 
Wherefore Do Ye Tempt the Lord? 

Ellis T. Rasmussen 104 

Where Hibiscus Bloom, Kenneth S. Bennion 113 

Which Is Your Type of Teaching? Keith R. Oakes 288 

Who Need It? C-4 

Who Presides in Sunday School Meetings? 

George R. Hill 28 

Why Children Remain in Junior Sunday School 

after Baptism, Mima Rasband 312 

Why Genealogical Work? T. Bowring Woodbury 138 

Why Genealogy? Theodore M. Burton 434 

Why I Became a Mormon, Aviva Levine 125 

Why "Keep a Welcome"? , C-4 

Why the Book of Mormon? Francis W. Kirkham 472 

Why Paul's Ageless Influence? Joe J. Christensen 174 

Wilkin, Bruce W.; Teamwork for Success 468 

Widow's Mite, F. Donald Isbell Center spread, July 

Wilkinson, Ernest L.; In the Spirit of the Master 88 

Will You Be a Missionary? Howark C. Maycock 464 

Witnesses for Christ (C), Burl Shephard 

Inside back cover, August 

Witnesses: In the Mouth of Two or Three Witnesses, 

Richard O. Cowan 328 

Woodbury, T. Bowring; Why Genealogical Work? 138 

Woodruff, Asahel D.; Lessons That Lead To 

Improved Behavior 72 

World Is One Neighborhood, Arch L. Madsen 26 

Y-Z 

Young, Hazel F.; Easter Is a Special Day 4 

Young, S. Dilworth; Resurrection 132 

Young People Have Courage, Too; Marshall T. Burton.. .308 
Youth fitness: Cut the Profits from Digging Gold 

Out of Dirt, Rex A. Skidmore 118 

Youth: Fleetness and Responsibility of, 

David O. McKay 289 

Youth: How Can Youth Find God? Marion D. Hanks... .474 
Yovail Dancers: When We Know People, 

We Love Them; Burl Shephard 318 

Zucker, Louis C; Pharisees 224 

ILLUSTRATIONS 



Abraham, Beloved of God 67 

Abraham — Friend of God (M) Center spread, January 

Adam and Eve statue at World's Fair 420 

Airman C-Back cover 

Alligator egg Back cover, May 

And Always Remember Him (C), Arthur R. Bassett 

Inside back cover, November 

Angel to the Papagos 301 

Archives, genealogical 434 

Areas of Genealogical Microfilming (M) 

- Inside back cover, February 

Arizona Temple 434 

Arrival of Mormon Missionaries Center spread, August 

"At One with God" (C) 51 



\ 



B 



Baby with parents 360 

Behold The Man (Jesus Before Pilate) 243 

Binding Pictures into Booklets 487 

Book of Mormon study 472 

Boy C-Back cover 

Boy with arms folded in prayer 56 

Brossard, Edgar B 211 

Browning, Robert Outside back cover, July 

Buehner, Carl and Bertha: family pictures 385, 386 



Calendar, music (C) 341 

Cans being filled 101 



DECEMBER 1964 



505 



Page 

Catalog: Key to the Library (C) ....Inside back cover, June 
Center spreads 

Abraham — Friend of God (M) January 

Eliezer and Rebekah February 

Christ Taken Captive March 

Smith, Joseph Fielding and Jessie Evans April 

Hill, George R. and Elizabeth Odette May 

Christ Healing the Blind Men of Jericho June 

The Widow's Mite July 

Arrival of Mormon Missionaries August 

John on Patmos September 

Lord's Prayer September 

Christ at Emmaus .October 

Dawn of Christianity in Hawaii November 

Doubtful Thomas December 

Chapel, inside, during meeting C-7 

Chesterton, G. K Outside back cover, June 

Children, faces 476 

Children in horse-drawn carriage 419 

Children in Junior Sunday School class 144 

Chinese Christmas play performers 407 

Christ and the Rich Young Man 40 

Christ appearing to the Nephites 322 

Christ healing the blind 121 

Christ Healing the Blind Men of Jericho 

Center spread, June 

Christ in the Garden of Gethsemane, by 

Heinrich Hofmann 199 

Christ raising the widow's son 136 

Christ Taken Captive Center spread, March 

Christ's entry into Jerusalem 122 

Church government flow chart 283 

Clark, J. Reuben, Jr 334 

Clasped hands C-5, C-10, 444 

Coed C-Back cover 

Coed reading Holy Bible 34 

Commandments of Men, M. Lee Miller (C) 

Inside back cover, April 

Couple being greeted C-6 

Covers 

Fun for the Family ...January 

I See Growing Things February 

Where Hibiscus Bloom March 

When Shall We Teach? April 

"Teach Ye Diligently" May 

Serve the Widow: Serve the Lord ..June 

Peace Through Play July 

Where Is Opportunity? August 

We Make Records September 

A Gift for Grandfather (Howard W. Hunter) -October 

Expressing Our Thanks November 

Acclaimed, Humble Birth December 

Coon, Abraham 21 

Cowan, Richard O.; Tame and Wild Olive Tree (C) 

..Inside back cover, October 

D 

Danish couple , C-Cover 

Daughter and father 12 

Daughter and father inspecting flower 73 

Daughter on knees; mother in chair 186 

Daughters pinning corsage on their mother 79 

da Vinci, Leonardo; "The Last Supper" 196 

da Vinci, Leonardo; "The Redeemer" 192 

Doughnut 91 

Dutch boy and girl C-Cover 

E 

Eastern Gate of Damascus 378 

Ecclesiastes 1 and a carnation .158 

Egg, alligator Outside back cover, May 

Eliezer and Rebekah Center spread, February 

Ephesus 379 

Europe about A.D. 1190 (M) 261 

Evans, Elaine B.; sculpture of Adams and Eve statue.. ..421 
Evans, Richard L 470 

F 

Fall and the Atonement (C) Inside back cover, March 

Family C-Back cover 

Family bulletin board 18 

Family council 214 

Family entering chapel 4 

Family gathering 480 



Page 

Family in family prayer 5 

Family in Junior Sunday School 4 

Family looking up Cover, January 

Family of Abraham (C) Inside back cover, January 

Family with tape recorder 4 

Father and children watching geese Cover, April 

Father and daughter 12 

Father and daughter inspecting flower 73 

Father and five sons inspecting eggs 3 

Father and small daughter 205 

Father sitting on bench with two sons 182 

Father taking picture of three sons 4 

Five sons and father inspecting eggs 3 

Flannelgraphs, center spreads 

Isaac, Man of Peace January 

Abraham, Beloved of God ...February 

Joseph in Egypt March 

Their Faith Never Wavered May 

Prayer Is a Mark of Greatness June 

On a Morning in May July 

King David and the Little Lame Prince August 

Our Happiest Christmas October 

Lehi and His Family Obey God November 

Fletcher, Dr. Harvey; James C. Wheelwright; and 

Lynn M. Wheelwright 8 

Flow chart of Church government 283 

Friberg, Arnold; God speaks to Moses from the 

burning bush 303 

Mormon Bids Farewell to a Once Great Nation 149 

Christ Appears to the Nephites 322 

Nephi Subdues His Rebellious Brothers 432 

The Giving of the Law 485 

Fun for the family Cover, January 

G 

Genealogical class 434 

Genealogical class by Arizona Temple 434 

Genealogical files 138,434 

Genealogical microfilm 434 

Genealogical work sheets 413 

Genealogy: Catalog: Key to the Library 

Inside back cover, June 

German woman C-Cover 

Girl, child C-5, C-Back cover 

Giving of the Law (Moses) 485 

God Speaks to Moses from the burning bush, 

Arnold Friberg 303 

Good Samaritan 81 

H 

Hands clasped C-5, C-10, 444 

Harris, Martin 266 

Harris', Martin, Headstone 267 

Hawaiian Sunday School teacher by sea shore.. Cover, March 

Head of Jeremiah 363 

Head of Risen Christ, by Michelangelo 409 

Henry, Patrick 45 

Hill, Dr. Chester W.; and ward musicians 339 

Hill, George R 233, 394, Center spread, May 

Hofmann, Heinrich; Christ in the Garden of Gethsemane.. 199 

Horse-drawn carriage with children 419 

Hospital scene ... 474 

Hour Glass 262 

Hunter, Howard W. and grandchildren Cover, October 



I See Growing Things Cover, February 

Insights into "We'll Keep a Welcome" (C), 

Anthony, I. Bentley Inside back cover, September 

Instructor display 350 

Isaac, Man of Peace (flannelgraphs) 

Center spread, January 

Isaiah Outside back cover, August 



Jackson, Andrew Back cover, December 

Jacob Back cover, September 

Japanese family C-Cover 

Jeremiah, Head of, The 363 

(Jesus Before Pilate) Behold The Man! 243 

Jesus Christ and the Rich Young Man 40 

Jesus Christ (Bust) Inside back cover, August 

Jesus Christ (Bust) 461 



506 



THE INSTRUCTOR 



Page 

Jesus Christ on donkey; Palm Sunday 122 

Jesus Christ preaching 208 

Jesus Christ washing His Apostles' feet 52 

Jesus Christ with children 373 

Jesus Christ with outstretched arms 14, 284 

Jesus Raising Lazarus 83 

Joseph in Egypt Center spread, March 

Junior Sunday School children in class 144, 278, 279 

K 

Kimball, Rodney, family 292 

King David and the Little Lame Prince (flannelgraphs) 

. Center spread, August 



Laboratory 479 

Lehi blessing his son, Joseph 140 

Liberty Bell - 249 

Liddle family 300 

Lord's Prayer, The Center spread, September 

M 

McKay, David O C-3, 1, 129, 289, 329 

McKay, David O., in front of Huntsville home 89 

McKay, Sister Emma Ray Riggs and David 169 

Madonna adoring child 448 

Making History Come Alive (M) 

Inside back cover, December 

Manuals, Sunday School 271 

Maxwell, Elsa Outside back cover, November 

Michelangelo's Head of Risen Christ 409 

Miller, M. Lee; Commandments of Men (C) 

Inside back cover, April 

Milton, John 16 

Missionary C-Back cover 

Missionary-guide at Mormon Pavilion 421 

Mormon bids farewell to a once great nation 149 

Mormon Pavilion, New York World Fair 134, 420, 421 

Moses breaking the tables 

Center spread, small pictures, December 

Moses: Giving of the Law — 485 

Moses with tablets 43 

Mother and children examining book of remembrance 

Cover, September 

Mother and Son 252 

Mother at baby's crib 66 

Mother in chair; daughter on knees ..... 186 

Mother with two sons burning trash 58 

Music calendar (C) 341 

Musicians: Dr. Chester W. Hill and ward musicians 339 

N 

Nephi Fashioning the Plates Center spread, April 

Nephi subdues his rebellious brothers 432 

New York World's Fair: Mormon Pavilion 

Adam and Eve statue 420 

Missionary-guide and visitors 421 

Elaine B. Evans, sculpture and statue .421 

Nine Aspects of Being and Becoming "At One with 

God" (C) - 51 

Norwegian couple C-Cover 

O 

Oakland Temple 417 

"O God, the Eternal Father" (music) 30 

Old Juniper 280 

Old Testament prophets 43 

Organ music to accompany Sacrament Gems 31, 75 

117, 157, 195, 235, 277, 317, 359, 402, 447, 493 



Page from an old account book (Genealogy) 21 

Palm Sunday, Jesus Christ on donkey .....122 

Palmyra and vicinity (C) Inside back cover, December 

Parents with baby 360 

Parents with three daughters C-Back cover 

Paul's Journeys (M) 376 

Pea canning operation 101 

Peace Through Play Cover, July 

Peale, Norman Vincent Outside back cover, March 

Peas being inspected before canning 100 

Pedigree chart of Abraham's family 

Inside back cover, January 

Pineapple being processed for canning 100 



Page 

Plaque on Areopagus — Hill of Mars 378 

Prayer Is a Mark of Greatness Center spread, June 

Prayer Is for Guidance (C) Inside back cover, May 

Prophet Joseph Smith 61 

President David O. McKay in front of his 

Huntsville home 89 

Prospective Missionary (coed) reading Holy Bible 34 

Prophets from Old Testament 43 

R 

Remembering Mother 79 

Richards, LeGrand 467 

Ross Becomes a Deacon (series) 212 

Ruth, the Girl from Moab 255 

S 

Sandberg, Sheryl, with Junior Sunday School class. .278, 279 

Scandinavian lady C-Cover 

Sealed cans being stacked for boiling 101 

Serve the Widow: Serve the Lord Cover, June 

Serviceman C-Back cover 

Sill, Sterling W 424 

Simon Peter 162 

Simpson, Robert L 282 

Singing girl '. 353 

Small daughter and father 205 

Smith, Joseph 61, 368, 456 

Smith, Joseph F 295 

Smith, Joseph Fielding Center spread, April 

Southern Far East Mission (M) 407 

St. John on Patmos Center spread, September 

Stake Mission, Richard O. Cowan (C) 6 

Stars 236 

Stephen's Gate 378 

Student behind desk 264 

Student with teacher C-9 

Sunday School Manuals 271 

Sunday School worship service C-7 

Swedish girl C-Cover 



Tame and Wild Olive Tree (C), Richard O. Cowan 

Inside back cover, October 

"Teach Ye Diligently" Cover, May 

Teacher at chalkboard 73 

Teacher in office 274 

Teacher with student C-9 

Temple, Oakland 417 

Temple to Artemis in Ephesus 379 

Ten Commandments: Giving of the Law 485 

Thanks to Thee, Lorin F. Wheelwright 353 

Titles and Dates of Sunday School Lessons (C) 

Second Quarter, 1964 84 

Third Quarter, 1964 202 

Fourth Quarter, 1964 326 

First Quarter, 1965 454 

"The Last Supper" by Leonardo da Vinci 196 

"The Redeemer" by Leonardo da Vinci 192 

Their Faith Never Wavered Center spread, May 

Two sons burning trash, mother observing 58 

Types of Teaching (C) Inside back cover, July 



Vandenberg, John H .....256 

W 

Welfare: Filling cans 101 

Welfare: Fresh pineapple being processed 100 

Welfare: Overview of pea canning operation 101 

Welfare: Sealed cans being stacked for boiling 101 

Welfare: Shelled peas being inspected before canning. .100 
"We'll Keep a Welcome," Insights into (C); 

Anthony I. Bentley Inside back cover, September 

Wesley, John 456 

Wheelwright, James C; Lynn M. Wheelwright; and 

Dr. Harvey Fletcher 8 

When Shall We Teach? Cover, April 

Where Hibiscus Bloom Cover, March 

Widow C-Back cover 

Widow and helping deacon Cover, June 

Worship service C-7 



Yovail Dancers 318 



DECEMBER 19 64 



507 



Making History Come Alive 



by Richard 0. Cowan 



History comes alive when one is able to clothe 
the bare facts with vivid impressions of the persons, 
places, and times involved. Reading autobiograph- 
ies and historical accounts, studying maps and pho- 
tographs, all help bring life to our appreciation of 
history. There is nothing, however, that can quite 
compare with the experience of actually visiting the 
scenes where history was made. 

Francis Parkman, a noted American historian 
who wrote of the French and Indian Wars, visited 
the sites of these battles, reconstructed in his mind 
to the best of his ability the action that took place 
there, and only then proceeded to write his historical 
narrative. 

Students of the life of Christ have long appre- 
ciated the fact that visiting the scenes of the Mas- 
ter's life makes the events of His ministry seem all 
the more real. The spirit of this thought has been 
captured in the beautiful hymn, "I Walked Today 
Where Jesus Walked." 

In a similar way those interested in the history 
of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints 
have found not only information but also inspiration 
through visits to the places where the thrilling 
events of the past occurred. 

Just after the beginning of the Twentieth Cen- 
tury, Church leaders recognized the importance of 
historical and inspirational landmarks and so began 
a program of purchasing them and of erecting bur- 
eaus of information to help tell the story of what 
happened there. This may be regarded as an im- 
portant phase of the broader work of keeping a his- 
tory of the Church for the expressed purpose, as the 
Lord stated it, ". . . for the good of the church, and 
for the rising generations. . . ." (Doctrine and Cove- 
nants 69I8.) 1 

Thousands of persons have had the thrilling ex- 
perience of visiting Palmyra. Being in the Sacred 
Grove, contemplating the magnitude of what took 
place there, and having the opportunity of bearing 



(For Course 7, lesson of January 10, "Why Joseph Prayed"; for 
Course 11, lesson of January 10, "In Search of Truth"; for Course 
29, lesson of January 10, "Visit of the Father and the Son"; and of 
general interest.) 

Tor further discussion of the Church program of purchasing 
historical sites and erecting bureaus of information see James B. 
Allen and Richard O. Cowan, Mormonism in the Twentieth Cen- 
tury, Brigham Young University Extension Publications, Provo, Utah, 
1964. 



witness to the truthfulness of the Restored Gospel, 
is an experience never to be forgotten. Another 
spiritually thrilling experience is to stand at the crest 
of the Hill Cumorah and realize that upon its slopes 
Joseph Smith received the record that has gone forth 
as a second witness for Jesus Christ. Other sites in 
the immediate vicinity also hold interest for students 
of Church history. 

Joseph Smith's family moved to Palmyra during 
the summer of 1816 and purchased a 100-acre farm 
southwest of town. Their land was situated just 
over the line in the Manchester Township. This 
may explain why both Palmyra and Manchester are 
designated almost interchangeably as the Smiths' 
home during these years. It was here that young 
Joseph witnessed a series of revivals which he de- 
scribed as a "great cry and tumult" bringing "no 
small stir and division among the people." (See j ^ 
Joseph Smith 2:5-9.) 2 ^ 

A present-day reminder of this religious "tumult" 
is to be seen at the main intersection in town. On 
each of the four corners stands a church building 
representing a leading religious denomination. 

It was in a grove on the Smith farm, where the 
Prophet had gone to find answers to his religious 
questions through prayer, that the appearance of 
the Father and the Son opened the Dispensation of 
the Fulness of Times. It was at the nearby Hill 
Cumorah that Moroni delivered the Book of Mor- 
mon plates, and at Egbert B. Grandin's press in Pal- 
myra the translated record was subsequently pub- 
lished. Martin Harris, a prosperous neighbor, mort- 
gaged his farm to help pay for the publication. 

Many of us live near other interesting and im- 
portant historical sites; if we study their significance 
they can help make that portion of history come 
alive. Furthermore, there has been no more thrill- 
ing period in Church history than the Twentieth 
Century. Although as teachers of history we try to 
reconstruct the past, let us not neglect the present. 
Let us build testimonies in the realization that, as 
in all former ages, the Lord's work is being directed 
by living apostles and prophets today. 

2 See also "Religious Setting for the Restoration," by Richard O. 
Cowan, The Instructor, November, 1962, page 396 and accompanying 
chart. 
Library File Reference: Historic landmarks. 



508 



THE INSTRUCTOR 



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E 



PALMYRA BIRTHPLACE OF MORMONISM 




THE INSTRUCTOR DECEMBER 1964 



Compiled by Allen K. Reinhold 



1/3 wrimwals division 

ki tmwm 



Second Class Postage Paid 
at Salt Lake City, Utah 




Waiting brought his finest hour. 



Andrew Jackson: 

Art by Bill Johnson. 

Patience is frequently the com- 
panion of good timing. So often we 
have moved when we should have 
waited. And then we are sorry. 

During the battle of New Or- 
leans in 1815, fiery, hickory-tough 
Andrew Jackson realized the value 
of waiting, of timing. This was 
when the British lines were moving 
toward the Americans across cane 
stubble silvered by frost. 1 Jackson 
ordered his men to cease fire to 
clear the view. As the enemy ap- 
proached, Jackson instructed his 
men to aim above the plates of 
the white cross belts which latticed 
the enemy red tunics. 

The red line, running now, 
reached within 300 yards of the 
Americans. But Jackson's men, 
many of them frontier sharpshoot- 



TIMING 

Our son Owen is short for his 12 
years. He also has a freckled nose 
that is crooked. He will not say 
how it got that way. But it looks 
as though he had either been 
kicked by a horse or hit by a hay- 
maker. 

A few days ago we took Owen 
to a clinic to consult a specialist 
about straightening his nose. 

"Yes, that nose needs fixing all 
right," the doctor said "But I am ^"^ "££ iO^thTsfe. 
going to recommend that we do was ^ A sheet rf oKmge 



not straighten it now 

Owen looked relieved. I looked 
puzzled. 

"I am going to recommend that 
you make an appointment for 
straightening the nose three years 
from now, in April," the doctor 
continued. "With hospital facili- 



flame belched out. The fire con- 
tinued. The silvery field of cane 
stubble was soon strewn with fal- 
len redcoats. On that January 8, 
the British lost 700 men killed, 
1,400 wounded, and 500 captured. 
Jackson's losses: seven killed and 
six wounded. 



ties crowded as they are, that will ft ^ Andrew Jackson , g finest 

give us several months to make ^ Re became & national herQ 

arrangements. We should be able In ^ ^^ of New Qrleans he 

to do the surgery in June, when ^ ^.^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 
Owen is out of school. second> 



"Why a three-year delay?" the 
doctor added. "There is a chance 
that if we do the surgery now the 
nose will cease to grow. I would 
not like to see Owen, as a man, 
with a Boy Scout's nose." 

We got the message. Timing is 
important in straightening a boy's 
nose. Timing is important in much 
of life. 

(For Course 9, lesson of January 17, "A 
Leader Is Courageous"; for Course 11, lesson 
of January 24, "Watting and Learning"; and 
of general interest.) 



Timing so often turns an inci- 
dent into an event, brings success 
where defeat could have come. 

The author of Ecclesiastes wrote: 
"To everything there is a season, 
and a time to every purpose under 
the heaven: ... A time to rend, 
and a time to sew; a time to keep 
silence, and a time to speak." 2 

Marquis James, The Life of Andrew Jack- 
son: Part One: The Border Captain, New 
York, New York, the Bobos-Merrill Company, 
1933, pages 243-247. 

2 Ecclesiastes 3:1, 7. 



Timing is important in teaching, 
too. One of the most memorable 
lessons I ever received came when 
I was a boy of about ten. On a 
neighborhood street a construction 
crew was laying pipe. The joints 
were sealed with molten lead from 
a huge pot over a burning fire. One 
evening after the workmen hadg| 
gone home, some of us boys dipped *= 
sticks into the pot of hot lead. Af- - 
ter I pulled out my stick and al--g, 
lowed it to cool, it had the appear- *g 
ance of a small cattail with a head 
of lead on the end. I was proud 
of my trophy. 

I was shaken later when some- 
one said something about stealing. 

That night we had a family eve- 
ning together in our home. My 
father told a story about an Arab 
boy leaving for a long journey. His 
mother gave him some money in 
a bag. Then she sewed the bag in 
the lining of his coat for protec- 
tion against bandits. On the jour- 
ney, the caravan was stopped by 
robbers. When the boy was asked 
if he had money, he said, "Yes." 
Then he explained that it was hid- 
den in the lining of his coat. Im- 
pressed, the bandits commended 
the boy for his honesty and al- 
lowed him to keep his money. 

After forty years, the story re- 
mains vivid to me. I shall ever be 
grateful to my father for waiting 
for the right time in my life to 
tell it 

I am going to look at Owen's 
freckled, crooked nose for many 
more days. Sometimes it may an- 
noy me. But I hope it will remind 
me that there is a time for impor- 
tant moves, that patience is some- 
times more powerful than action. 
— Wendell J. Ashton. 

Library Pile Reference: Time.